What's the difference between "marine" and "murine"?

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  • sepia
    Lv 7
    8 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    https://www.yourdictionary.com/murine

    Murine is an uncommon adjective pretty much restricted in zoology to mice and rats and the diseases they cause or transmit. Murine comes straight from the Latin adjective mūrīnus “of mice, mouse-colored,” a derivative of the noun mūs (inflectional stem mūr-). During the 4th century b.c., original intervocalic s in Latin became r; thus the Roman gens name Papīsius became Papīrius, and mūsīnus (if the word already existed) became mūrīnus. Mūs remains unchanged in the Latin derivative noun mūsculus “muscle.” Mūs is identical with the very common Proto-Indo-European noun mūs, which remains mūs also in Germanic (English mouse); mūs becomes mŷs in Greek, mū́ṣ– in Sanskrit, and mysz in Polish. Murine entered English in the early 17th century.

    https://ucmp.berkeley.edu/exhibits/biomes/marine.p...

  • 8 months ago

    Surely you could have consulted a dictionary.

    Please don't go around assuming words must be related because just one letter is different.

  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    someone mispelled it

  • Lôn
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Marine....to do with the sea.

    Murine...to do with mice etc.

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  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    You do know don't you that Google works as a good dictionary?

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    A marine is a jarhead while Murine is a solution for irritated eyes.

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    Marine=sea murine=rodents. 

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