Does the fair housing act legally force my apartment manager to charge me the full cost of early lease termination?

I need to terminate my lease early and they charge 1500 bucks to do so. I asked if i could negotiate a lower fee but was told due to the fair housing act they couldnt budge. This complex has a history of lying to and taking advantage of tenants, and that law doesnt really make sense to me if it exists. Does the law really keep them from doing this or are they making excuses?

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  • 3 weeks ago
    Favorite Answer

    The fair housing act does not require them to charge you this. In fact I don't think this act states anything about charging rent to people who leave. Having said that, they can still choose to charge you this and if they insist on charging this (for whatever reason) then you do have to pay it or you will likely have your credit significantly marred. In other words, I think the fact that they are saying this is due to the fair housing act, when it isn't, doesn't really help you any. If you point out that what they are saying is in error, they won't care and will still likely charge you this.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    In order to avoid any appearance of violating the FHA...they probably treat all tenants exactly the same. 

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  • 3 weeks ago

    Fair housing means they can't treat someone different than anyone else.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    He said that because he doesn't want to have to argue with you.  He has the right to charge what he wants.  What is commonly charged, if he allows it at all, is your rent times 2 or 3.  So two or three months' rent to break the lease.  If your monthly rent is $500 a month, then it is not unreasonable at all.

    Source(s): Certified Paralegal, with 25+ years' experience & with Landlord & Tenant law experience.
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  • 3 weeks ago

    There is no law on this subject, And the fair housing act includes nothing on this subject, but the landlord is within their legal rights to not budge if the fee is in the mutually agreed contract between you and the landlord.  Time for negotiations ended the moment you signed the contract.  Legally if you fail to pay the fee, the landlord can sue you and win easily.  The landlord can lower or waive the fee if they desired with mutual consent from you, but is under no obligation.  And because the landlord is a business person the idea of letting people off from paying what it owed, usually isn't what they seek to do.  It's not personal, just business. Sorry.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    It does not force them to charge for early termination.

    However, if they charge those who are another race, gender, religion, etc., then it forces them to charge those who are your race, gender, religion, etc., as well.

    It does not force them to charge, but it forces them to treat every race, gender, religion, etc., the same.

    If they wanted to charge no one, then it would not force them. But it does keep them from treating your race, gender, religion, etc., better than others.

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  • Judy
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    no.  But it really doesn't matter - they have the legal right to say no to any negotiation.  You can hardly call it 'making excuses' when they are just saying no to giving you something you have no right to.  Why do you feel they should 'negotiate' with you?

    • Ethan7 days agoReport

      I think calling being dishonest about the reasons behind the decision "an excuse" is fair. My stay here has been horrendous, and i dont feel this place merits the full payout. I could post my review of it on google and i think my several page list of issues would deter many prospectful residents.

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Sounds like an excuse to me.  I don't see how they are taking advantage of you.  You signed a legal agreement and now want to break it, there's a cost for it which I suspect was in the lease documents which you agreed to.  Boo Hoo Hoo.

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Early termination fees would be stated in your lease which is a legally binding contract.

    Read up on contract laws.

    • John3 weeks agoReport

      They could be renegotiated IF your landlord is willing to do so.  What is his incentive to do this, though?  As it is, he gets what was originally agreed to.

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  • R P
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    I don't think the Fair Housing laws specifically disallow management to lower the early termination fees. If you want to push the issue, ask management to show you in writing where the laws states that.

    However, it really doesn't matter since the person working in the office does not have the authority to lower the fee. That person has to follow corporate policies as well as what is in your lease.

    Source(s): FL landlord
    • Ethan3 weeks agoReport

      Thanks for the response! Yeah she asked her higher up before i got an answer. 

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