Astronomy question: if a star in our sky explodes (we see the change tonight in the night sky) and the star is 1 million light years away...?

....does that mean it actually exploded 1 million years ago?

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    yes

    .......................

    • JonZ
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Thank you.

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  • 2 months ago

    That is correct.

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  • Retief
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Correct, the distance is how long it took the light to reach us.

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  • MARK
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Yes, you are correct.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes it does means it exploded 1 million years ago

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  • 2 months ago

    That's correct. The "News" of the explosion has been traveling for 1 million years - and finally got here just now, even though the event took place 1 million years ago.

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  • 2 months ago

    I'm not exactly sure of the time frame that it takes light to travel that far but if a star goes Nova thousands of years ago you won't see the evidence of it here in the sky on planet Earth until the light reaches us which could take millions of years or thousands of years or hundreds of years depending on how far away the star is

    • Wally2 months agoReport

      He explained it is "one million light years away" ergo the light WOULD INDEED take 1 million years.  That is what the concept is!

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  • Brian
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Got it in one......

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