George
Lv 4
George asked in Cars & TransportationAircraft · 2 months ago

If the plane window breaks, why does everything get sucked out? What causes that?

9 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Blow a balloon.  Put a hole on it.  The same thing happens in an airplane.  The difference in pressure inside an airplane and outside air causes everything to get sucked out (or sucked in).

    • Anon
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      Nothing sucks, it is a higher pressure moving to lower.

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  • zipper
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    The pressure in the plane is at sea level so it is greater that the pressure out side, hence the out side acts like a grant vacuum cleaner!

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  • 2 months ago

    Pressure differential.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Air pressure at high altitude.  That's why it's always a good idea to keep your seat belt on throughout the flight.

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  • Erik
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It's the difference in pressure.  It's not so much that everything gets sucked out, more like pushed out.

    • Anon
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      Exactly. Nothing actually "sucks" its that there is a higher pressure inside.

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  • 2 months ago

    Take your mom's vacuum cleaner, turn it on, put your  tongue into the hose end.

    The hose end is an aircraft window opening at altitude, and your tongue is Auric Goldfinger, on his way out.

    Now you know.

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  • 2 months ago

    First, it is not everything. There were instance where the integrity of a fuselage was compromised, something called explosive decompression, and most passengers lived through this. Aloha Airlines flight 243 in 1988 saw a Boeing 737 lose 18 feet of the upper fuselage; with the only victim being a flight attendent who was not seated with a belt on at the time.

    And things are not sucked out, they are blown out. The pressure inside a plane -- usually pressurized to the equivalent of 8000 feet altitude -- is 10.9 pounds per square inch. But the pressure outside of that flight 243, flying at 24000 feet, would have been 5.7 psi.

    Which means that there was a pressure differential of 5.2 pounds per square inch to push anything out through whatever hole there was.

    But the point is that this cannot last long, since the air inside the plane would escape very fast, causing the pressure inside to very quickly match the one outside.

    Hopefully, by that time, the crew had already initiated the procedure to descent to a lower altitude while the emergency oxygen masks had been deployed.

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  • Olive
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    The cabins on the plane are pressurized to keep people alive n well in high altitudes and if window breaks there's an enormous amount of pressure forcing towards the window from the cabins 

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  • 2 months ago

    The air pressure outside of an aircraft at cruising altitude is too low to let people breathe enough to stay alive. So, the interior of a jetliner is pressurized with more air than is outside, so if a window breaks, the greater pressure inside the aircraft will go out the hole until the interior pressure drops to the same as that outside.

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