Should you get your alignment fixed before rotating tires?

I went to get an oil change and my tires rotated. When I went back to the shop they said they didn't rotate my tires because it appeared that the back tires were wearing in the inside and that my alignment was possibly off. He then recommended the shop down the road for the alignment. Does this sound right to you?

21 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    YES............

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  • 1 month ago

    It's not abnormal. 

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  • 1 month ago

    he was right. also IF you get just new tires they go on the BACK not the front.. unless you replace them all.

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  • zipper
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    YES!  It sure does. Your rear could be out of line and the wear would make the tiers unsafe in the front.

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  • 1 month ago

    It's best to leave the tires where they've been so that the alignment mechanic can see how the tires have been wearing.

    Source(s): Mitsubishi Master Tech
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  • 1 month ago

    If the tires are not worn even on the front or rear end, the alignment people might tell you to replace at least the front tires to get a decent alignment. If it's time to get new tires, then buy those first and then get the alignment soon after.

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  • 1 month ago

    The purpose of rotating tires is for more even wear.

    If your alignment is off, that causes uneven and premature wear.

    I would recommend an alignment even if you don't rotate the tires.

    • Lv 4
      1 month agoReport

      good answer; also, uneven wear is indication of faulty equipment/ alignment: correctly aligned tires with correctly funtioning supension generally wouldnot require moving them about, which only messes up all the tires & results in unsteady steering & tracking; try to replace worn tires in axle pairs

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  • 1 month ago

    The wear pattern does clue the mechanic about the way the wheels are misaligned. The shop didn't want to align your wheels- who really knows the full issue. Maybe their equipment wasn't up to the job. If bad alignment caused uneven wear, rotating the tires could possibly get you 4 uneven tires instead of just 2 unevenly worn tires.

    By the way, Many Toyotas ( don't know what you have) do not come with rear wheel camber adjustment and as they age, the back wheels tend to squat with the bottoms sticking outward and the tops leaning inward. There are kits to add camber adjusting cams to them so that situation can be made right and the inner edge of the tire can be prevented from doing that extra wear in relation to the outer edge. Toyota camber kits are an after market part you can buy . Depending what car you have, the shop doing your rear wheel alignment can tell you if that's what you need or not.

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes. Uneven tire wear is a sign of alignment or suspension problem.

    • Jen1 month agoReport

      So the mechanic was right not to rotate my tires as asked and maybe just recommend the alignment?

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  • 1 month ago

    You do not need an alignment every time you rotate the tires.

    However, if you have noticeable uneven tire wear, that's a sign of possible alignment issues and does justify having the alignment checked. Some shops will "check" your alignment for free and only charge you if they actually need to make adjustments.

    I would be frustrated if a shop just didn't do the work they were supposed to do. They should have rotated the tires if that was part of the agreed service. They can tell me I need an alignment but they should still do the work.

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