Is there such a thing as quitting a job under false pretenses?

I've had to redo my resignation letter several times.  I didn't give a reason why I wanted to leave but my employer insisted on it, so I finally listed a job offer that I had.  After I thought about it more, I changed my mind and decided to move in a different direction, I want to try to avoid having to be on my feet all day.

I don't want a raise from my current employer, all they would do if anything is offer me the 25 cent raise they should have given me months ago to stay.  They can't match what other employers are paying.  I told them I wasn't interested in a raise.  I fully intend to leave.

They seem to know everything about the jobs other employees have went to and they know how much they were offered to start.  

My supervisor asked me if the information I put on my resignation letter was correct, he said if it wasn't I need to change it because they will be checking on it and if he said if my reason is not correct, that is considered leaving under false pretenses and that won't go well for me.  He said they didn't believe I was actually qualified to go to the job I said I was going to.  I don't want to have to submit another resignation letter.

12 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    They want a reason for leaving, tell them what you wrote above.  Also mention that your employer "insisted" that you rewrite the resignation.  When they reject this letter, refuse to write another one.

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  • 1 month ago

    No, there isn't. You have no obligation to give a reason. There is no way for it to "not go well" other than they don't give a good reference.

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  • 1 month ago

    You don't need to give a reason. What happens if you don't? He will continue to force you to work there? My last resignation letter just said, "I quit".

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  • xyzzy
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You are not legally required to submit a resignation letter or to give notice of leaving. It is simply a courtesy. The classic way to tell your current employer it is none of their business is to say you are leave "to pursue another opportunity"

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Do you live in a right to work state?

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  • 1 month ago

    You don't have to give any reason.

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  • 1 month ago

    why didn't you put on your resignation, "considering another job opportunity with 'blank'"... that way it wouldn't have been a definitive statement... loopholes man, find them

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  • 1 month ago

    You are under no obligation to give any information to your current employer. There is no such thing as "leaving under false pretenses" (but the employer can get in trouble for hiring under false pretenses).

    I've always been told that a letter of resignation should simply be "This is my formal letter of resignation from (company name). My last day will be _______. Sincerely, Name"

    That's it. If you love the people, your boss, whatever you can always talk to them and say what you want or contact them later.

    I've also never written a letter of resignation without having something else lined up, so I've never used it as a threat for a raise, promotion or whatever, so my letters were always the end no matter what the response was.

    Do not submit another letter of resignation unless you did not specify your last day. Once you specify your last day (assuming it meets contractual requirements that you may have signed, if no requirements you don't have to give a long notice but two weeks is standard) stick with it. The company can ask you to leave early, but they also have to pay you within certain timeframes depending on the state you live in. Some states, if they ask you to leave the premises, they must give you your final paycheck at that moment. Many states are with 48 hours. Know your state's regulations. 

    Do not be bullied by these idiots. You are wise to leave.

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  • 1 month ago

    Your boss is a liar.  Like the other guy said, you don't have to give a reason for leaving.  They don't have to give a reason for firing you!  It's a two-way ongoing agreement and either of you can end it immediately.  You're only making up a reason out of politeness.  If you were telling the truth, you'd say "I want a better job".  And how would that sound?

    I've quit MANY jobs in my life.  I almost always made up some polite-sounding reason, but the real reason was always the same--I hated my job, I hated coming in to work in the morning.  I felt the situation was stacked against me and I couldn't succeed in this job. AND, very often, the company had lied to me about promotional opportunities, raises, conditions, etc.  Or my boss quit and I didn't like the new boss.  Or the management had changed and I didn't like the new management.  And I knew better opportunities were out there.  And perhaps I'd even found a better job.  But you don't want to say those things so you make something up. Don't worry--they lie to you too, don't they?

    Employers have consultants who do studies of the industry so they know what other companies are paying.  SOME companies want to pay top dollar for the best people.  But most companies want to pay a lot less than that.  This is a deliberate decision on their part, and they deserve whatever consequences follow.

    BTW, I have never applied for a job without them asking me what I made at my last job.  One time, just for curiosity, I refused to tell them.  And the interview ended right there!  The fact is, it's illegal for your employer to tell them what they paid you!  So when I changed jobs, I usually lied and told them what I THOUGHT I should be making.  They always offered me that plus  about10% (to make it sound like a deal.)  In fact, back in the 70s/80s, when jobs were plentiful, that was the only way to get a raise!   8^P

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  • 1 month ago

    You're telling us everything except why you want to leave.

    You have three options:

    1. Lie about why you're leaving. But what's the point of that?

    2. Tell them why you don't like it there. Why not? Got some gripes? State them.

    3. Tell them you have "personal reasons" for leaving.

    Or, you could tell them it's none of their business (basically, option 3). It's up to you.

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