Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceRenting & Real Estate · 1 month ago

How do I nicely tell a tenant the landlord isn't going to address all his issues he asked for?

I started managing a property and have a new tenant who moved in who sent me a long list of things he wants done to his apartment. The building is 100+ years old and most of the issues do not have to do with habitability. How do I nicely tell him we will fix the issues pertaining to habitability, but not going to do cosmetic work. The unit was rented out as is, as far as cosmetics go.

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  • 1 month ago

    Just figure out which ones you can fix and tell him the landlord would only approve those repairs. Tell him that he knew the condition of the places when he signed the lease and if he didn't like it, he shouldn't have signed.

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  • 1 month ago

    Your tenant doesn't really have any rights to tell you how to make your property LOOK, as long as his unit or dwelling quarters is in decent shape. You simply tell the tenant that only the issues that directly affect his living unit will be handled--the rest will not be changed. This is YOUR house. It doesn't have to suit your tenant, looks-wise, but you are required to keep your tenants' units habitable and safe. 

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  • Bort
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    You just simply tell them that. "I apologize, Sir. But the only things on your list I'm able to approve for repairs are the ones that pertain to habitability. The concerns you have that are cosmetic won't be approved."

    If he argues or asks simply apologize again but explain that cosmetic changes or repairs are not required by law, you can only approve and get the repairs done for him that are required by law. Some people don't understand what is required and what's not. Politely fill them in. 

    If policies allow share with him that if he prefers to make cosmetic changes he can do that but it's his responsibility to cover those costs. Or if policies allow it offer reimbursement if he submits receipts or credit toward his rent if he wants to do things like get the place painted, fix holes from previous tenant's wall decorations and things like that. Insure him that the habitability issues will be repaired as soon as possible, and make sure they are done as soon as possible. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Tell him exactly that - that issues related to habitability will be addressed as they arise. Cosmetic issues are something he was, or could have been aware of, prior to agreeing to the rental contract. Any updating, remodeling and painting will be done on the landlord's timetable for doing those things. Make him aware that when he vacates, if any improvements are made to the unit, it will result in higher rent to recoup the costs of the improvements. Therefore, the landlord may be willing to perform certain of his requests for either a fixed cost to be paid by him, or a negotiated higher rent.

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If you have no skills/education about the job you took on then why are you doing the job? Yu obviously address anything that the law states you need to address and all and anything the landlord has given you permission to address, the rest are 'wants' of the tenant which are very different to statuatory law of what needs doing... refer to the landlord/tenant law, the legal contract and remind the tenant this is a business relationship

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  • 1 month ago

    The way you did in your post.  The property was rental "as is."  The landlord will address issue pertaining to habitability such as a broken heater or water leaking. 

    What you and the landlord have to decide include:

    1.  Will you let the person out of their rental contract to avoid dealing with this person?  

    2.  Will you allow the person to make cosmetic changes of their own?

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  • 1 month ago

    You are not required to address his stupid and unreasonable demands.  I wouldn't address anything until the necessary work has been done, and then tell him the rest are not necessary to his living there and won't be done, and if he wanted a nicer place, then he should have rented one.  We are not required to upgrade to your desires - you get what you rented.

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  • 1 month ago

    Depends on the specific issues...we dont see any list, everything on there could be legit...

    That said, most of the stuff probably isnt legit.  You just tell them what you will repair, let them wonder about the rest.  If they push, speak with the owner about how hard you should be pushing back.  

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  • Judy
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    just tell him what you ARE going to fix and that the others will not be addressed

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  • 1 month ago

    1st of all, any FUNCTIONAL or safety issue needs to be corrected, NOT just HABITABILITY. 

    Tenants agree to a rent amount based on amenities.  If you include AC,. dishwasher, even a garbage disposal in the unit when rented, you  must continue to maintain them in most cases, unless specifically excluded in the lease.  If a cabinet falls off a kitchen cabinet, it needs to be repaired, the cabinet can still be used, but without a door, it allows dust to get up dishes and glasses which is a health issue.

    Simply cosmetic issues do not need to be fixed as long as they are not posing any health or safety issue.  You can allow the tenant to pay for cosmetic upgrades if they wish.

    Think about this:  You have 2 apartments that are very similar.  almost same size, same block, same view, same age, etc.  The only difference is apartment 1 is $1000/month without a washer dryer or washer dryer.

    Apt 2, has an extra closet for a washer dryer  that you provide and the kitchen has a dishwasher.  It rents for $1100......

    the appliances break-in this case not tenants fault....and you don't fix them...but tenant took that unit for an extra $100/month to have those amenities....you are violating the lease....neither is habitability issue, but must be fixed.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Close enough for a thumbs up, even though we're only GUESSING what the actual issues are, as characterized as "habitability" or "cosmetic", ignoring the "functional or safety", which you point out.

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