Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 month ago

Why do UK people doesn't say (R) when they speak?

For example, 

American: before ( bifor )

British: before ( bifo )

American: fire ( fiyyer )

British: fire ( fiyye )    Etc

13 Answers

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    There are different ways to pronounce the letter 'r'.  In fact it might be the sound that's pronounced the most ways by different people, just in English.  (French and Spanish and German people have even MORE ways!)

    The r at the end of the word is sometimes pronounced more gently, coming out like 'ah'.  'Fye-ah rather than 'fye-er'.  This is common in British English and also the American South.  Plus people pronounce the vowel before the final r differently, like in Australia it's more like 'foy-ah'.

    What's really interesting is the New England accent, where they leave the 'r' off 'fye-ah' but put it there where it's not called for, like 'replicer' for 'replica'.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Same reason you don't pronounce the R in 'caterpillar' or 'surprise'.

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  • 1 month ago

    It’s just regional dialects and such

    To them they might be saying the “r” and just have a different idea of the phonetic association with an “r” in a word because the accents they’ve heard all their life (and when being taught or generally absorbing how to speak the English language as young children) emphasize it in a different way than Americans ? Neither is necessarily wrong it’s just got to do with what you’ve become used to. I know it’s sometimes hard to remember but American is not the international default for all things :D

    Source(s): logic, dude
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  • 1 month ago

    Why do you doesn't use better grammar?

    And why do you doesn't do a bit of research before asking such a silly and uninformed question?

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  • MARK
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Your question is very over generalised. There are many local accents in the UK. I live near a large city and people from the north and south of that city have different accents and there are different accents in all the surrounding towns. In many Northern English and most Scottish accents the letter 'r' is pronounced in many words. In addition, those who speak a sort of middle class English will often voice the letter 'r' in words.

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  • 1 month ago

    Well in most western European languages the R is sounded stronger or rolled.In English that is not the case and often not sounded very strong.

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  • Peter
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    What part of the UK have you been to?

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  • 1 month ago

    Singers are often taught to suppress the Rs at the end of words like "father", "ever", etc. to avoid that grinding "rrr" sound at the end of a long note.  Sometimes it's hard to remember to sing "FAHthuh" or "EHvah" but it does sound better.

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  • 1 month ago

    This comes down to rhotic versus non-rhotic pronunciation. 

    English people do say r, but they are choosy about where they enunciate it. Basically, they will “roll” the r (rrr-eally!) when launching *onto* a vowel, but not when landing *after* (afta) one.

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  • 1 month ago

    Maybe it’s really hard to say r when you’re missing a lot of teeth. 

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