I have an anxiety disorder and sometimes it keeps me awake at night and I don't get much sleep..how can I get more sleep with my anxiety?

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  • Ambar
    Lv 4
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Here are some simple and practical tips you can try that have helped many …

    1. Get regular exercise at the right time of the day. Exercise during the morning or afternoon can help one to be drowsy at bedtime. But working out close to bedtime can interfere with sleep. Exercise is a great way to relieve or cope with anxiety. It is good for the body and the mind.

    2. Give yourself time to wind down. If you start relaxing before it’s time to go to bed, you will likely fall asleep more quickly.

    (It’s good to finish chores and other responsibilities early so that you’re not worrying about them at bedtime.)

    Exciting films or engrossing reading material can also have a stimulating effect. Before going to bed, it may be better to read something relaxing, listen to soothing music, or take a warm bath. This helps calm anxiety any time of day. Also, regarding electronics, some experts warn that the type of light that comes from a phone, a TV, or a tablet can make it harder for you to get to sleep.

    3. Experts say that you can teach your brain to associate bed with sleep by lying down only when you really mean to sleep. People who eat, study, work, watch TV, or play video games in bed may find it harder to fall asleep.

    4. Preparing the body for restful sleep also involves watching your diet. While alcoholic drinks make a person feel drowsy, they can actually impair sleep quality. Coffee, tea, cocoa, chocolate, and cola-based drinks should be avoided at night because they are stimulants. On the other hand, small quantities of mango, sweet potato, banana, persimmon, palm cabbage, rice, bean sprouts, or nuts stimulate the production of serotonin and can thus be sleep-inducing. A word of warning: Eating a heavy meal late at night can be as harmful to sleep as going to bed on an empty stomach.

    5. Just as important as our presleep routine is the environment in which we sleep. A pleasant temperature, a dark and noise-free room, and a comfortable mattress and pillows are an invitation to a good night’s sleep. In fact, with so much comfort, it may be hard to get up the next morning. But remember, staying in bed longer than necessary, even on the weekend, can disturb your sleep pattern and make it harder for you to sleep the following night.

    For tips and advice on coping with anxiety, please click on the following link, scroll all the way down to the topic subheading “Anxiety and Stress” …

    https://www.jw.org/en/bible-teachings/peace-happin...

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Hot milk and brandy

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  • 1 month ago

    How do you know you need to sleep for long hours?I sleep 6 hours and its enough!No disorders here though...

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  • 1 month ago

    I would listen to some music that you find relaxing. Sometimes this can do the opposite though so perhaps put a comforting film on, perhaps a Christmas one or watch cat videos on youtube.

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  • 1 month ago

    Take some melatonin before you go to bed, that normally helps me. Or you could stay active during the day and that will make you tired at night so you can go to sleep.

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  • LAN
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    No.  You are a trolling hypochondriac that does nothing but post pity me rants over and over. 

    If you really had a legitimate problem you would be under a doctors care and be able to ask him instead of mindlessly attention whoring here over and over.

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  • 1 month ago

    The famous Mayo Clinic has an article on insomnia. I especially like its home remedies.

    The FDA has approved this technology for anxiety and insomnia. Your insurance may cover it.

    This TV report says that the safety of the device is “well-documented” which is true, although long-term effects have not been carefully studied.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=melzXkH8KPY

    Youtube thumbnail

    There's no quick fix for an anxiety disorder. Statistics show that therapy (CBT) is better for most patients than medicine, and that even self-help based on CBT helps a lot of people.

    The book recommended most often by mental health professionals is The Feeling Good Handbook by Dr David Burns.

    You can't go wrong with stress management. It's something we all need. Therapeutic breathing is especially good. I have details about this in my recent answers.

    Other things take some effort but they're very rewarding - things that make your life meaningful, like a good hobby, art, or volunteer work. Taking care of your health with the right exercise, etc. If you go to Metapsychology, you can read a psychologist's review of Dr Steve Ilardi's book ("a splendid book"). He's the therapist who headed a university lifestyle-depression project and developed a program for stress reduction.

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  • 1 month ago

    Give some thought to making your bedtime surroundings as comfortable as possible.  Warmth or coolness, ventilation, nice blankets and pillows, no noise, near-complete darkness – whatever would make things most serene. 

    I know the feeling of "stewing" about something during the night, causing me to wake up and stay awake.  Sometimes it helps to remind myself that if I can go back to sleep, my subconscious mind will go to work and I may wake up in the morning with a good approach to the problem.

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  • k w
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    go for 20 min walk before or after dinner.....it will help....

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    do more exercise. It is PROVEN to help with sleep, depression, stress and anxiety

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