Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 1 month ago

when and how did Brexit begin? (or when did first start hearing about it? why it has taken so long?)?

Update:

why people wanted it so much?

Also, why people STILL want to be in the EU?

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  • 1 month ago
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    The vote happened in March 2017.  It was a referendum started by a PM who was so sure the electorate would vote 'Remain' that he held the vote even though he didn't want Brexit.  When it backfired he resigned.

    You can read some details here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brexit

    As to why it took so long, it's because for a long time UK's PM, Teresa May, was operating under the idea that there were a ton of 'red line' demands that could not be compromised on.  Then Borris Johnson came along and compromised on one of the biggest, Ireland, and as a result got a deal done.

    CGP Grey is a youtuber who does some awesome videos and had some great ones on Brexit.  Definitely worth watching even if you think you know Brexit.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1Yv24cM2os

    Youtube thumbnail

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agZ0xISi40E

    Youtube thumbnail

    Brexit is popular among some UK voters because they believed the EU central political authority had taken too much power yet was unaccountable to voters in member countries.  Specific policies opposed included various rules protecting various industries, immigration issues, and more. 

    The Remain side wanted to remain because the vision of the EU is a lot like the USA.  The USA is sort of a giant free trade block with every state allowing open trade with every other state.  The EU is trying to slowly turn Europe into that.  And while many Remain folks agree the EU is imperfect, they see reforming it from within as the approach rather than leaving and thereby sacrificing duty free access to all of Europe via trade.

    Still, the vote succeeded by a narrow margin and there's a lot of room to believe that if the vote were ever re-held, it would switch to Remain.  Which is why Leave-ers worked very hard to portray ANY attempt to hold another vote as being undemocratic...which worked.  Suckers!  

    The problem is that the only choices given were 'Leave' and 'Remain'.  No details.  No specifics.  No nuance.  Which is part of what lead to the chaos to follow since May never really got any instruction from voters as to what 'Leave' really meant and wasn't allowed to hold a more detailed referendum.  Further, many members of parliament were emphatic 'Remain' people and sought to oppose any deal.  Ireland and Scotland also were complications.

    • Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      thanks for great answer, , but can you answer too, when did people first start to talk about it? was it not a talked about issue before 2017?

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  • 1 month ago

    The trajectory of the EU has been revised over the years. It started as a free trade area and was morphing into a full United States of Europe.

    Some politicians warned of that possibility when we joined in 1973 but it was about 25 years ago that Nigel Farage saw the writing on the wall and made it his life's work to get the UK out of the clutches of the EU Globalists - we still have the UK Globalists to cope with, however.

    Any country that voted against the EU was either asked to vote again until they got the "right" answer or there was some treaty or rule change imposed that kept them in. That worked right up to the UK referendum and for some years beyond. In fact, the EU are still trying to keep the UK bound by all the EU rules.

    The Globalists find it inconvenient to have lots of countries in the world so they hit upon the idea of packaging them all into continents as the last step to staging a complete takeover.

    They will fight tooth and nail to get their way. That is why it has taken a long time. The people pretending to organise the Leave effort were mainly Globalists who wanted to stay.

    That is why Prime Minister David Cameron, who reluctantly allowed the referendum to take place, resigned as soon as the result was known. He had let down his fellow Globalists.

    • Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      thanks again for excellent answer!

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