Circuit interpretation?

Why is the 14 ohm resistor in the following circuit, which has a short circuit between terminals a and b, considered to be in series with the 6 ohm resistor but not the 5 ohm resistor? The current, which flows clockwise, is the same for all three resistors. The total resistance is 4 ohms. 

Update:

Couldn't the circuit just be redrawn excluding the short circuit so the 14 ohm and 5 ohm resistor would exclusively be connected at a single node?

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4 Answers

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  • oubaas
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Req = 5 // (14+6) = 20*5/25 = 4.0 ohm

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  • 4 weeks ago

    The definition of "in series" is the same current. A voltage source across terminals a and b would result in different currents.

    • aleem4 weeks agoReport

      But the 14 ohm and 5 ohm resistors do have the same current in the circuit with a short circuit between a and b

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  • Dixon
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The current isn't the same in all for all three resistors. It is two parallel branches. The current shown in the question is in the wrong direction in the 14, 6 branch. 

    Redraw...

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    • Dixon
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      KVL Voltage round a loop is zero. KCL Net current into a node is zero (or equivalently, current in = current out)

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  • 1 month ago

    The 5 ohm resistor is connected across nodes a and b.

    Together the 6 ohm resistor and the 14 ohm resistor form a single series 20 ohm resistor across nodes a and b.

    You have to first evaluate your voltage potentials before evaluating the rest of the circuit.

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