do you need to oil an enamel cast iron dutch oven?

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    ............................

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  • 4 weeks ago

    No, that's not normally done.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Yes, and simply enough to thinly coat the bottom.

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  • abdul
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Yes you do, otherwise your food might stick badly.

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  • IvaB
    Lv 5
    4 weeks ago

    No.  Naturally,you would use oil when cooking just like you normally do.Coating the outside in oil is useless and can make a heavy pot slippery,and also a possible source of a fire which of course both can be a hazards.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Yes. Rub about 1 tbsp very thinly all over the inside and outside with a dish towel.

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  • 1 month ago

    When cooking or baking in it use a bit of oil if it is called for.  You do not need to "season" it like you do a cast iron pan.

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes. at least a little.

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  • 1 month ago

    You mean like regular cast iron? No. The enamel coating is non porous and will not absorb oil the way porous cast iron will.

    If you mean using oil or other fats or lubricants for cooking, yes. Use your oils and fats the way you would with stainless pots.

    I LOVE enameled cast iron and have many pieces of it in various sizes and shapes. It’s typically very expensive, especially the good quality European stuff, which is what I have. While not quite suitable for all types of cooking and very very heavy, it is my “go to” for a good deal of my cooking. I love how it cleans up so easily and how it is so beautiful I can display it on shelves in my kitchen.

    It does require a bit of extra care of the surface. Never use metal utinsels against it as they leave marks, opt for wood or silicon. I’m not a fan of silicon but do have silicon tipped tongs I use with my enameled cast iron. And don’t use steel wool or green scratchies (the blue ones are fine) as they will etch the surface of the enamel and affect it’s non-stick qualities.

    For cleaning after use you can usually just wipe them out then rinse and dry them after use. If it has cooked on stuff from long cooking like braising rinse it well in the sink then fill with warm soapy water and let soak for a while. Once whatever is cooked on there gets nice and soaked you can typically wipe it off.

    I try not to soak longer than overnight because the cast iron can start to rust anywhere it is chipped or if it is the the poor quality chinese type. I will not only bother to get the better quality European ones, even though more expensive, as the enameling is so much better and cared for properly, they last forever. I’ve had a number of the chinese pieces that have failed.

    There is a Jamie Oliver recipe for roasting chicken with milk, cinnamon and sage (that I highly recommend, google for it) that I cook a lot. That REALLY gets stuff stuck to the pot because of the milk sugars and I can get that off easily with a good soak.

    • linkus86
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Agreed, enameled cast iron rocks.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Is the enamel going to rust? If not then oiling it will not do any good.

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