Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceRenting & Real Estate · 2 months ago

I think my landlord may be taking a mortgage holiday and will not let us know. Should we have to pay our rent?

Our landlord is motivated solely by money and nothing else. We believe he will take advantage of everything he can get. A mortgage holiday due to Coronavirus is no exception. But we have no way of knowing if he has actually done this. If so, are we not being exploited by him? How can we find out if he is taking a mortgage holiday? He won't offer the information! He would take the opportunity of getting rent from us while he has no costs of his own with glee. What should we do? Thank you.

31 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    YOU are not responsible for making sure your landlord pays his mortgage.  YOU are still responsible for paying the rent.  Period.

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  • 2 months ago

    Now back to reality eh? You signed a lease and agreed to pay an x number of dollars every month from the first month of the agreed term to the last! Failure to pay your rent any month throws you into default and you will most likely face eviction and get a possible court judgement against you for any unpaid rent!

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  • 2 months ago

    The 'holiday' does not relieve you of the responsibility of paying. It does not mean free rent. It merely defers paying until the crisis is over. You still owe the money.

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  • 2 months ago

    So are you saying if he had no mortgage and the house was clear he should not charge rent?  Don't be stupid.

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  • AgProv
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    It really doesn't matter. You still signed a contract to pay the rent every month without fail. If he is on a mortgage holiday on the property that does not affect you at all. (And usually I would be the first to advocate for the tenant - but in this case there really isn't a case. If there's nothing to prevent you from paying the rent and no special circumstances apply - no case.)

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  • 2 months ago

    It doesn't matter if he is or not (though you'd better assume he isn't without proof anyhow), you still have to pay your rent, as least you do for now. 

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  • Judy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Yes of course you still owe the rent, and NO you're not being exploited. What should you do? Pay your rent. And by the way, the landlord will still have to pay his mortgage just not right now - he'll still owe the money and have to pay it later..

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You still owe your rent money, pay it.  If he was short of money, would that mean you had to pay more rent?  No, you'd be screaming "that's not my problem".

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    • kap2 months agoReport

      "Landlords are eligible for a mortgage holiday if their tenants are experiencing financial difficulties. Technically they needn't pass this on to their tenants, but MORALLY THEY SHOULD." - Martin Lewis, MSE

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Your landlord's financial situation is none of your business. 

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    • kap2 months agoReport

      "Landlords are eligible for a mortgage holiday if their tenants are experiencing financial difficulties. Technically they needn't pass this on to their tenants, but MORALLY THEY SHOULD." - Martin Lewis, MSE

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  • 2 months ago

    Pay your rent in accordance with your lease/rental agreement. IF your landlord is eligible for and/or uses any sort of "mortgage holiday" is none of your business and has no impact on your own obligations. Besides, even IF there were some sort of "mortgage holiday" for landlords (as opposed to owner-occupied single-family residence), he'd still have to pay up his mortgage & interest sooner or later.

    Don't get your knickers in a twist. Pay your rent.

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    • kap2 months agoReport

      "Landlords are eligible for a mortgage holiday if their tenants are experiencing financial difficulties. Technically they needn't pass this on to their tenants, but MORALLY THEY SHOULD." - Martin Lewis, MSE

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