Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 2 months ago

what happens during a solar eclipse?

10 Answers

Relevance
  • 2 months ago

    Confused chickens go back to roosting and coyotes start to prowl. 

    Owls began their nightly hunt and wolves start to Howell.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 2 months ago

    The Moon comes between the Earth and the Sun

    Casting a shadow onto the Earth

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 2 months ago

    The moon's shadow moves across the Earth's surface.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Bill-M
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The Moon passes between the Sun and The Earth.  The Moon's Shadow passes over the surface of the Earth in specific locations.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Clive
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Nothing much.  The Earth, Moon and Sun line up in an exact straight line, so as we see it from Earth, the Moon blocks the Sun out for a few minutes.  The Moon is still moving in its orbit around Earth so it doesn't last long.  But while it's happening, it gets dark and cools down.  Not totally dark because the Sun's corona is still shining around the edges of the Moon.  This really confuses wildlife - they think night has come early, and when the eclipse ends, birds start singing again.

    It just so happens that the Sun and Moon appear to be the same size so we see it like this.  If the Moon were further away, it wouldn't block out the whole Sun - occasionally this happens so you still see a ring of Sun around it and that's an annular eclipse instead of a total eclipse.

    And also because of this, the shadow the Moon casts on the Earth is only a few miles wide, so you won't see it at all unless you're exactly on the line the shadow traces out, so interested people will travel for miles to see it.

    If the Moon's orbit around Earth and the Earth's orbit around the Sun were exactly lined up, there would be a solar eclipse every month at New Moon.  But they aren't, they're angled about 5 degrees apart and cross at two places called the nodes. So we only get an eclipse when it's New Moon at a node.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 2 months ago

    The Moon and the Sun line up with each other. Since the Moon is closer to the Earth than the Sun is, the Moon seems to cover up the Sun. The Moon is moving west to east orbiting the Earth while the Earth is rotating west to east. The Moon's shadow falls on Earth in a narrow band. Because the distance of the Moon from them Earth varies, often the Moon is too far away to completely cover the Sun. That is when it an annular solar eclipse. Eclipses happen only when the moon is slide to the points where the Sun's apparent orbit and the Moon's orbit intersect. Those points are called apsides. The Moon's orbit is tilted at 5.12° angle to the ecliptic, the plane of Earth's orbit. Lunar and solar eclipses often occur in doubles and sometimes triples 2/weeks apart.

    https://www.farmersalmanac.com/solar-eclipse-quest... 

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    3 guesses. The population increases 9 months later.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • keerok
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Cookie monster eats the sun, finds it too hot, vomits it.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • martin
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The moon comes between you and the Sun.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • A.J.
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The Moon passes in front of the Sun. Full eclipse darkens.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.