Is A Pharmacy Technician Allowed To Answer?

can a pharmacy technician explain to the patient the difference between brand and generic drugs and their effectiveness, as well as the difference in manufacturers?

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  • 2 months ago

    If they are not licensed pharmacists, absolutely not.

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I don't need to be one to answer this.  They're exactly the same and just as effective.

    Brand name drugs cost more because they're usually produced by the company that developed them, and they want to get their research money back.  So they patent them and being the only company allowed to make them, they can charge enough to earn back the money they spent on researching them.  When the patent expires after some years, then generic manufacturers can make them, and these will be cheaper because the actual cost of just making them once they've been invented is less.  And they may have a different name which is the scientific name rather than some invented brand.  Let's say Viagra comes out of patent.  Then it might become available cheaper called sildenafil.

    For example, I have to take three drugs for high blood pressure, ramipril, bisoprolol and furosemide.  These have been around for years so they are available in generic form, and that's what I always get given.  They work perfectly well as I know from my blood pressure readings when I have check-ups, and what furosemide does to me!

    (To explain, the first two act on the heart and slow it down in two different ways, and furosemide treats water retention, which frequently goes with this.  If you have swollen squashy ankles, very likely you could have a heart problem.  So you take furosemide and it makes you pee.  Oh boy it makes you pee... in my first few days on it I was glad to have a hospital bed close to the toilet.  It's OK now but I can still guarantee that half an hour after my morning pill I need to "go".  Drinking lots of water "to keep hydrated" is no good to me at all.  It isn't for anyone, you only pee it out again if it's too much, but if I do it, it hits my drug-powered water works in a big way.  Yep, generics work.)

    So if you're buying your own non-prescription medication, go for the generic version if there is one and you know what it's called.  Let's say you're American and want a painkiller, and the one you know is Tylenol.  If you can find acetaminophen, it's the same stuff.  Here in the UK, it's called paracetamol, and that's what I look for rather than some brand name.

    Of course a pharmacy technician can explain this, unless some drug company is paying them.

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  • 2 months ago

    i dont see why not

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Not in my State - WHERE?

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    This is the type of question that should be directed to your supervising pharmacist.

    They will let you know what you may and may not discuss.

    At the very least, any advice given should be evidence based, not anecdotal or a personal opinion.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Anyone can do that if they know the facts.

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