Why are paintings by Picasso and Monet among the most expensive paintings?

But, for example, paintings by Rembrandt and Aivazovsky are not? Why is classical art cheaper than post-impressionism?

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  • 2 months ago

    No one will give an exact answer, but I would like to draw attention to two important differences between the present and the past. First, modern people have a lot of time, they can train without worrying about a piece of bread. No nation has ever had such a preference in the history of mankind. No one could afford to spend years training. They worked as apprentices at once, painting small areas on the master's picture. Secondly, tools for drawing/painting have become very, very cheap and affordable. Previously, tempera, oil painting, and even pencil drawing were very, very expensive. No one could afford to spend a ton of paper and paint on training. Accordingly, today, with cheap materials, it is performance skills that are highly valued. It is developing.

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  • 2 months ago

    Classics are not cheaper, they simply do not exist on the market. All of it is either in museums, or in private collections that are in museums, or at least in private collections that will never be sold, because their owners do not need to, and they will sit on these paintings until they die. . after that, the collection will end up in museums. Of the old masters still circulating on the market, only minor works by minor artists remain, with rare exceptions. A quick glance at the current lots at Sotheby's at the time of writing this answer shows only one painting of any note from the pre-impressionist era — a basket of plums by Louise Moyon, kitchen-sized, no different from the other two hundred baskets of plums, peaches and apricots that Moyon painted in her lifetime, and therefore valued at only half a million mad bishops. It's not a bad job, but who will buy it? Museums are not interested in such works, their storerooms are already bursting with works that they will never exhibit. Private owners remain. The auction price at a private auction is made by two people competing with each other (actually three, including the host, but not the essence). There is no price ceiling for buyers of really good paintings, but will they fight for it? Neither in price nor in dignity it will not grow (the fact that you can earn money from reselling paintings is a myth born in the minds of people who have never seen the Chronicles of these resales). Therefore, there is only a question of personal taste. And there will be few people who are ready to compete for a picture of this class — and, accordingly, its price at auction will not grow much. While there are still many works from impressionism onwards in private collections, and not all of this their owners so much want to keep: these are usually minor works of already primary artists — at the same Sotheby's there are now Picasso, Matisse, Gauguin, Modigliani — paintings that might well not be, so their estimates are also low, from half a million to a million. So the classic works of a really high class that could compete with the not yet sold out modern-just not on hand. Even if they are resold, it is usually the new museums that buy something from the old ones, because otherwise they will have nothing to exhibit. Well, if a lot of Rembrandt's "Night watch" were put up now, I can assure you, it would beat all the public's ideas about money.

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  • 2 months ago

    Perhaps the most prominent impressionist artist is Claude Monet. He's the most prolific. His paintings are fascinating, and you can meditate on them. I spent about an hour at his Impression job, and it was like magic. However, it is impossible not to note the work of Paul Cezanne, whose works became a new reference point for young artists and paved the way to modern art. Bright representatives, of course, are van Gogh and Gauguin, but they are more related to post-impressionism, although they all came from the Impressionists.

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    • miyuki & kyojin
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      in painting. Pablo Picasso and George Braque claim their Cubism derived from Paul Cezanne's works, thus Cubism insane and incompetent too. Vincent van Gogh pioneer of Expressionism that have silly basis. Paul Gauguin considered father of Primitivism. That name alone  is quite revealing. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Life in the XV-XVI centuries was very different from our life. It is unlikely that Bosch sat alone in the Studio with all the comforts, experiencing hallucinations and transferring them to his canvas. Bosch was a good and pious burgher who had married a rich woman and probably had a full staff of servants who could tell if the owner was suffering from some sort of hallucination. After all, Bosch lived in the heyday of the Inquisition. And, as is not surprising now, he was not considered a heretic either in life or after death. He received orders from both churches and high-ranking socialites. There is no doubt that the meaning of his paintings, now inaccessible to us, was clear to his contemporaries. There is an opinion that he transferred a certain text to the canvas - perhaps Proverbs, and, most likely, in his paintings there is more "secular" meaning than Christian. In addition, Bosch came from a family of artists - his grandfather, his uncles, and his father were artists. He had every opportunity to master the art craft, including drawing by imagination. (If you go from simple to complex, then drawing from nature - drawing from memory - drawing from imagination). Why did his imagination produce such pictures? Bosch lived in a difficult time - he is a contemporary of Michelangelo, lived in the Renaissance. It was a time when all the millennial heritage of Christianity was rejected, and everything that had been forbidden for centuries took its place. On the other hand, the Inquisition was rampant, and thousands of people were burned at the stake. The trade in indulgences was in full swing. The decline of morals, promiscuity and greed - that's what Bosch saw and what he painted in his paintings.

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  • snafu
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It’s dictated by how much someone is prepared to pay for a painting and whether somebody else wants it as well - that’s the art market.  

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  • 2 months ago

    Art critics are insane now. Pablo Picasso say in interview that he is charlatan selling trash to fools at absurdly high prices. I not pay one yen for his paintings or those by Claude Monet. Monet-san is Impressionist, and Picasso-san is Cubist. They lack skill of Baroque and Renaissance painters and are merely con artists. Impressionism is poor solution to non-existent problem, say Spanish Surrealist, and I agree. 

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    • Megumi
      Lv 6
      5 days agoReport

      Snafu needs a proper education in Art History. People who know Art History well know that it has rises and falls as do all areas of civilization. Modern Art since Impressionism is a Dark Age in Art. 

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It depends on the Collector.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Art can be a good investment, or a loser.  It goes in cycles, some artists popularity or interest in their type of art fluctuates - while some prices continue to skyrocket, others lose value over time.  It's hard to tell which will lose favor.  

    To me, it's a crap shoot, I don't know why post impressionism is favored over classical - although my favorite artist IS Van Gogh - and I have prints of his paintings displayed in my home.  They just... I'm somehow drawn into his work, they just fascinate me.

    • miyuki & kyojin
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Most people easily led like sheep. They believe much absurd :Kojira no Heh"! Impressionism and Post Impressionism consist of frauds selling rubbish at high prices. 

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Its human influence like the kings new clothes the little boy hadn't been instructed or expected to see them he didn't know what he was supposed to be seeing . Van Gogh sold one painting to cover his rent he is priceless today shot himself and took 3 days to die and will never know he was a successful 

    • Megumi
      Lv 6
      5 days agoReport

      He does not deserve to be successful. 

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