What was the last year before 1 A.D.!? ?

GOOGLE has done me no justice in my search and research and research and research on this topic 😂😞

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    In today's (Western) dating systems, that year would be 1 BC.

    At the time, there were many numbering systems (as there are today).  The closest corollary to the current Christian calendar would have been the Roman numbering system, which counted years from the founding of Rome in 753 BC.

    Hence, the year before 1 AD was counted as 752 (Ab urbe condita) in the Roman calendar.

  • 5 months ago

    Good question, to which I have no answer. I would like to know though. The romans with Caesar started a calendar with Anno Domini. There should be a year zero. 

  • 5 months ago

             1 B.C.

  • Tom
    Lv 4
    5 months ago

    The year Jesus went to, and died on the Cross.  Then, three days later;he rose!

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  • David
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    The year before 1 A.D. was 1 B.C. because according to the Christian calendar there was no 0 year.

  • 5 months ago

    It is commonly thought that B.C. stands for “before Christ” and A.D. stands for “after death.” This is only half correct. How could the year 1 B.C. have been “before Christ” and A.D. 1 been “after death”? B.C. does stand for “before Christ.” A.D. actually stands for the Latin phrase anno domini, which means “in the year of our Lord.” The B.C./A.D. dating system is not taught in the Bible. It actually was not fully implemented and accepted until several centuries after Jesus’ death.

    It is interesting to note that the purpose of the B.C./A.D. dating system was to make the birth of Jesus Christ the dividing point of world history. However, when the B.C./A.D. system was being calculated, they actually made a mistake in pinpointing the year of Jesus’ birth. Scholars later discovered that Jesus was actually born around 6—4 B.C., not A.D. 1. That is not the crucial issue. The birth, life, ministry, death, and resurrection of Christ are the “turning points” in world history. It is fitting, therefore, that Jesus Christ is the separation of “old” and “new.” B.C. was “before Christ,” and since His birth, we have been living “in the year of our Lord.” Viewing our era as “the year of our Lord” is appropriate. Philippians 2:10–11 says, “That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.”

    In recent times, there has been a push to replace the B.C. and A.D. labels with B.C.E and C.E., meaning “before common era” and “common era,” respectively. The change is simply one of semantics—that is, AD 100 is the same as 100 CE; all that changes is the label. The advocates of the switch from BC/AD to BCE/CE say that the newer designations are better in that they are devoid of religious connotation and thus prevent offending other cultures and religions who may not see Jesus as “Lord.” The irony, of course, is that what distinguishes B.C.E from C.E. is still the life and times of Jesus Christ.

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  • 5 months ago

    The "1 B.C." answers are correct, from a textbook perspective.  Except, of course, that wouldn't have been what anyone called it then; and these days it's customary to write "1 B.C.E." instead.

    The calendar's starting year wasn't established until well after Jesus's death, but the general idea is that year 1 was the year he was born.  They didn't count from zero because the Romans didn't have a zero.  Precise records never existed, so the year chosen to be 1 was a best guess at the time. 

    B.C. years count backwards from 1 starting the year before 1 A.D.

    This, by the way, is why the year 2000 was the last year of the 20th century rather than the first year of the 21st century.  The first century (the first hundred years on this calendar) were years 1-100, the next hundred were years 101-200, and so on.

    ---- About the comment:

    I have no idea where you get "4000 years" from.  If you want something like what the Jewish year was, that's an entirely different calendar.  The "A.D." date is in the calendar created by Roman Catholics.  At the time, the year 1 A.D would have been around 754 AUC (years since the presumed founding of Rome) and the previous year (1 B.C. in modern Western terms) would have been 753 AUC.  That may be off by a year or three, but you get the idea (I hope.)  Modern scholars figure the year 1 date to be about 4-7 years *after* Jesus's actual birth, so historical time measurements are very fuzzy, especially compared to today's atomic clocks with accuracy around a quadrillionth of a second.

  • 5 months ago

    -1 AD, because there was no year zero (except right before the big bang).

  • 5 months ago

    1 BC

  • sepia
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

               1 BC

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