When does a cancer patient need radiotherapy?

6 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    From thebstaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaart

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It's part of cancer treatment, to get any cancer cells that are missed in surgery, like hormone treatment and chemotherapy.

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  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It's not exactly a need. It is done when the alternatives are deemed worse. Cancerous cells are affected by radiation more than healthy ones, so you radiate the affected area and hope&pray that the sick cells die and the healthy ones don't become damaged. the advantage is that it doesn't require surgery. the disadvantage is that radiation can cause new cancer.  sometimes the risk can be reduced by injecting a shortlived isotope (with a halflife of a few days) directly into the affected tissue

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  • Pippin
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    When it is appropriate for the particular stage and the particular cancer.  It can be used alone for certain highly sensitive cancers that are also localized. (Stage 1 Hodgkin's Disease, for example.) More often it's used together with (either before or after) surgery to shink a tumor or mop up potential missed cells. (Early stage breast cancer after lumpectomy, for example or many brain tumors.)  Or, it can be used as palliative treatment in cases where the cancer no longer responds to chemo. (I had two friends receive it as a bridge to a clinical trial, in an attempt to get them strong enough to be eligible for the trial. )

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  • LAN
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    When the oncologist thinks that that is the best approach.

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  • 2 months ago

    Generally its done when cancer is still localized.  It may be used in situations where the cancer is in an inoperable location or where surgical risks are too great, and it may  also be done in conjunction with surgery to get any stray cancer cells that surgery may have missed. 

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