How do electrical fires occur?

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  • Anonymous
    2 weeks ago

    In one word:  heat 

    There are 2 general ways to unsafely make heat using electricity. 

    Drawing too much current through wiring.  Improper current interruption device for the wire size.  The word is:  overload. 

    Contact resistance.  That means a loose connection or a dirty/oxidized/corroded connection.  Resistance with current makes heat. Arcing can be in this category.

    There you have it. 

    Defective insulation is another cause of fires.

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  • 1 month ago

    Circuit breakers and/or fuses are sized to open circuits before conductor currents exceed safe levels. Excessive amps can heat wires red hot causing ignition.

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  • 1 month ago

    Electricity creates a high temperature igniting flammable materials.

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  • 1 month ago

    IT ONLY HAPPEN WHILE THE PROTECTION PARTS LIKE FUSE OR CIRCUIT BREAKER ARE FAILED TO CUT OFF THE POWER WHEN SHORT CIRCUIT IS HAPPENED ALONG THE SAME CIRCUIT PATH EITHER BY A DEFECTIVE APPLIANCE , WIRES TOUCHING,WIRE PARTIAL BROKEN AT THE AREA NEAR THE PLUG OR DEVICE ENDING OR CIRCUIT PATH WITHOUT ANY OVERLOAD PROTECT PARTS, OR BY MISTAKE REPLACING A HIGHER CURRENT RATED FUSE OR BREAKER.  VERY HIGH CURRENT OCCURS DURING SHORT CIRCUIT THAT BURNING THE POWER LINE INTO RED HOT IN A FEW SECONDS, OR ALONG THE DEFECT JOINT WHERE HAS HIGHER RESISTANCE THAT GENERATES HEAT AND BURNING WIRE PLASTIC SLEEVE , FIRE STARS MAINLY ALONG THOSE WIRES AREA.

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  • 1 month ago

    When electricity arcs due to a faulty connection or over heats a conductor due to an overload it creates a point of ignition if there is flammable material close enough when this occurs it will start a fire. An incandescent bulb produces illumination because the filament inside has an overload of current passing through it which causes the filament to glow and produce heat as well. Now imagine a wire that is much thicker with the same process going on.

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  • 1 month ago

    short circuits and high temperatures are responsible in majority of cases. 

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