Best way to COOK & SEASON a steak?

Best way to COOK & SEASON a steak?

will it be different for each cut , ive got interested in cooking recently and seen loads of videos online on people showing how to season a steak or what to cook it with and how to cook? but i was wondering whats everyone else's opinion on this or expert advice/knowledge ???

Ive seen in most videos the steak is seasoned with salt and pepper and some people even use seasoning salt like LAWRYS , as well to season it ?? then leave it to rest to asborb the seasoning??, ive also see other people season the steak but put oil on the steak first and then salt and pepper . \

Not to mention a lot of people cook it with rosemarry and thyme , shallots and butter  but some say its very hard to not burn the butter  while basting the steak?

and what sauce would you always recommend to serve it with ? red wine Jus , peppercorn and what to accompy it ?  asparagus , artichoke, mash ,  ???

and does it matter what oil? i.e canola , olive oil ETC.

I hope i can have your thoughts and advice on this,

as i havent cooked steak before properly and would like the best input,

Thank you

9 Answers

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    Christ dude, a lot a lot a lot of questions here...

    Do whatever seasonings you want on steak, but at the very least season aggressively with salt and pepper. Fattier cuts and more marbling require even more seasoning. Whatever makes the meat taste good, I’m not complaining. 

    Cooks primarily oil a steak directly when they can’t oil the surface, like a on grill or a broiler. That in my opinion is the only time when you should put oil on a steak. Otherwise just oil the pan. You look stupid lubing a steak when you don’t need to...

    The rosemary thyme shallot butter thing is a bit overrated, and extremely difficult for inexperienced cooks. Cooking thin steak to desired doneness and developing browning is hard enough, but achieving all that while basting in butter is near impossible if you don’t have a grasp on either concept. You’re better off making a good sauce to pair with the steak on the side than making the sauce WITH the steak. 

    Also, to even consider basting a steak, you need a thick cut of meat to begin with. If the meat you buy isn’t dinosaur, steakhouse thickness, then it will reach well done before you’re even ready to baste. Since most of the meat I buy isn’t that large, I have no reason to attempt basting and likely ruining a nice cut of beef.

    My person favorite sauce at a restaurant would be a red wine Demi glacé sauce. For simplicity at home, I skip the Demi glacé since it’s expensive to buy and time consuming to make right. Anyways reduce red wine with shallot garlic and herbs. When it starts getting thicker and slightly syrupy, add some honey or sugar to cut the acidity of the wine. Fish out herbs garlic and shallots. Turn off heat, swirl in at least 1 tablespoon of cold butter so it emulsifies with the red wine. It’s acidic and slightly sweet, a great pairing for a nice cut of steak. An easier sauce would be chimichurri or even a gremolata. Less often utilized and surely to impress. Basically chopped herbs like parsley cilantro and oregano, minced fresh garlic, a pinch of pepper flakes, red vinegar or citrus juice and zest (depending on which you’re making) and extra virgin oil. Doesn’t require any cooking at all.

    I’d say the classic sides are mashed potatoes and some veg. Asparagus, broccoli, carrots, spinach, etc. but I think that’s kinda boring and overused. I’d make carrot mash or glazed carrots with roasted potatoes or even a twice baked potato.

    Oil does matter. Use canola or vegetable oil since they have higher smoke point than typical olive oil. For cooking steaks perfectly, barely smoking oil is a must. If the oil isn’t even close to smoking and the pan is at a light sizzle when the steak is cooking, you’re not using nearly as high heat as you should. Brown the meat as quick as possible to prevent it from going tough in the center, and to take your time adjusting internal temp.

    • robert1 month agoReport

      Thank you

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  • Janet
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    No, it won't be different seasoning for every cut. Beef is beef, when it comes to flavor. But only SOME cuts are suitable for cooking as a steak.  Many cuts require being "wet-cooked" (a stew on the stovetop, or a covered pot roast with liquid in the pot).

    As for steak, I like the flavor of beef.  I use Montreal Steak Seasoning, but that is all.  No marinade, no BBQ sauce.

    As for the BEST way to cook a steak:

    https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1FGUR_enCA824C...

    • robert1 month agoReport

      Thank you

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  • 1 month ago

    people need to understand that putting salt on a steak, before you broil or grill it, dries the meat out----if you want salt, use it afterward--

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    in a broiler, or on a grill

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  • kswck2
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Ever get a steak in a restaurant with those nice grill marks on it?

    I Only use salt and pepper on a steak-and I season from a 'height', about 18 inches or so. Seasoning gets distributed more evenly. I rub the steak in vegetable oil and drop on the grill. After about 2 minutes I turn the steak 1/4 turn. Flip and do the same thing to the other side. Then let the steak cook till Medium. And I use a meat thermometer. 

    The old adage of oiling the grates is a misnomer, it just burns off quickly. Oil the Steak instead. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Seasoning is an easy one...a good steak needs ONLY salt and pepper.  And a lot more than you would think you need. 

    How to cook depends greatly on what cut it is and how thick it is and how you like it done. 

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  • Alpha
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    I'll answer your questions in reverse order:

    1) Oil. Yes, it matters because not all oils are appropriate for all types of cooking.  In the case of steaks, you should not use any oil that has what is call a low smoking temperature. The smoking point is the temperature at which the oil will burn and  and this means you do not use olive oil because for the high temperature that you typically cook a steak at; it would burn the oil (creating smoke) - not to mention trigger your smoke alarm.  An appropriate oil for cooking at high temperature are oils with high smoking point such as avocado oil, corn oil, peanut oil, saffower oil, sesame oil, sunflower oil, canola (although I dislike canola oil), etc.

    2) Side dishes. Typically, I prefer some sort of vegetables than a starchy dish such as potatoes, but this is my personal preference.

    3) Wine.  The conventional rule is red wine with meat and white wine with fish, but that is only because meat dishes tends to have a more hardier flavor and so will not be overwhelm by the equally hardier red wine.  As for seafood which typically have a more delicate flavor, white wine is usually served because it will not cover up the flavor. The purpose of serving wine with a dish is to enhance (not cover up) the flavor of the dish. If you can accomplish this with white for red meat and red of fish, there is nothing wrong with this.

    4)Which sauce to use depends on your personal taste.  For me, I like a sauce that is not a heavy sauce such that it covers up the natural flavor of the steak.  Prime choice cuts of meat have a distinct flavor and when I eat steak I want to be able to taste that flavor.

    5) Seasonings.It is all about personal preferences.  There is no right or wrong choices, only which ones you like more. The purpose as in the case of wine, is to enhance or bring out the natural flavor.  But which flavor and how much of it is strictly up to the individual. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Prefer it bland.

    You get the full flavor.

    Broiling is probably best.

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  • 1 month ago

    Use what YOU like.  

        

    I refer to grill meat over "red" (roble) oak with no seasoning at all. 

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