Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 1 month ago

What is your favourite, most under appreciated, under valued novel?

8 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago

    -As a child, The Pink Motel by Carol Ryrie Brink.

    -As an adult, Einstein's Dreams by Alan Lightman

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 month ago

    Appointment in Samarra by John O'Hara. Wild Sheep Chase is a novel Murakami wrote long before he became world famous, but I still think it is best work. Like with a musician, "I like his early stuff". 

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    "Neothink" by Mark Hamilton.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 month ago

    A good candidate for that category would be "A Confederacy of Dunces" by John Kennedy Toole. He wrote it in the early 1960s but committed suicide when it was repeatedly turned down by publishers. And in 1981 it won the Pulitzer Prize.

    I read it a year ago out of curiosity. Set in New Orleans, it's brilliantly funny and sad and infuriating all at the same time. I've pushed it at several of my reading friends and a lot of them hated it, but the ones who 'got' it thought it was stunning.

    • ...Show all comments
    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Glad to hear it! Wish I could share your enthusiasm for Murakami, but I just don't "get" him at all, though plenty of my friends do.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    This isn't as unknown/has as small of a fandom as it once did when I originally read them, but the All For The Game series is really good!!

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Hemingway's Chair by Michael Palin. Very subtle. Very funny. Great ending.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • j153e
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Jules Verne's "The Lighthouse at the End of the World" and "Paris in the Twentieth Century;"

    Zoran Zivkovic's "Hidden Camera;"

    not for its writing excellence, but for its premise:  "A Dweller on Two Planets;"

    Karel Capek's "R.U.R." and "The War with the Newts;"

    "The Camp of the Saints;"

    and, taken as fiction, "The Soulless One."

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Speed
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    I'll go with Scott Heim's "Mysterious Skin." The writing is lush and lyrical without venturing toward purple prose, and the story is gripping and really sad. I hope it's not even slightly autobiographical.

    It's the only DVD extra I've ever seen where the actors in the movie take turns reading the source material out loud. (Good movie, too.)

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.