is there something paranormal in the Bermuda triangle?

21 Answers

Relevance
  • 3 weeks ago

    I've been right smack inside it many times, and I've never seen anything I'd call paranormal.  The music is a bit unusual, but hardly paranormal.  You do know that Nassau Bahamas is located entirely within that triangle, right?

    You know what's funny?  I live in the Great Lakes area, where more vessels have disappeared with no explanation than have gone down in that triangle.  Even though the lakes altogether are less than 1/5 the size of the Bermuda Triangle, they've claimed more boats, planes and lives than that huge slice of the Atlantic.  But nobody has written books and theories about the Great Lakes Triangle (even though it's not a triangle), and I can explain why that is.  Watch this...

    Read the following words, in fact say them aloud if you can.

    - Nassau Bahamas

    - Lake Michigan

    - Bermuda Triangle

    - Turks And Caicos

    - The Edmund Fitzgerald

    That middle one made the little hairs at the back of your neck stand up a little, didn't it?  But check this out, Nassau and Turks & Caicos are located entirely within that same triangle, and they didn't do anything to you.  Lake Michigan is the deadliest of the Great Lakes, and that last thing was a huge lake freighter that sank in Lake Superior (with no explanation) in 1971, killing the entire crew.  Why is that, do you think?

    It's the name, not the facts.  There's just something exotic and evil-ish sounding about the name Bermuda Triangle, as if it's some forbidden place nobody would ever go.  When people start a story with "there I was in Bahamas", it's just not the same as saying "there I was in the Bermuda Triangle".  That's the power of a good name right there.

  • 3 weeks ago

    The only thing is n the Bermuda triangle is water. Nothing paranormal. 

  • 3 weeks ago

    No.  If you look at shipping disasters, air crashes etc across the world there's nothing special about the area.  However, in my book 'Here Be Dragons' I go into this question in unfictional terms.

  • Megumi
    Lv 6
    4 weeks ago

    No, there is nothing paranormal anywhere. The Bermuda Triangle is no more dangerous than any similar region of the Earth's seas. Ships, boats and planes travel there every day. If it was an especially dangerous area, insurance rates would be higher on things travelling there, but insurance has the same rate there, so this area cannot be especially dangerous.

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 4 weeks ago

    NO - the incident rate is the same as any other busy shipping area.

  • 👻
    Lv 4
    4 weeks ago

    It’s more of a scientific phenomenon, like toilets flushing the other way.. or Stone henge. It’s just weird stuff that is out of the norm.

  • Dr. NG
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    No, that's all legend and myth pushed by dishonest books and TV shows on their credulous audiences. I've been through the Bermuda Triangle many times. It's virtually overrun by fishermen, scuba divers, and pleasure boats of all kinds. Aside from that, it's one of the busiest areas on Earth for commercial traffic. (I'll put links in the comments). In normal times cruise ships with thousands of passengers pass through the triangle daily. As a paranormal claim, the Bermuda Triangle is even easier to debunk than astral projection. Usually, here, answers are opinions, this is not an opinion but straightforward undeniable facts that need to be ignored to keep the myth going.

  • Tom
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Not at all, but there MAY be a Oceanographic phenomena involved. Converging ocean currents in the area (Shown on most maps) and  bits and pieces from witnesses, when assembled, Calm water, radar "walls", water steps, fog, etc. Strongly suggests, that from time to time, a very large water Vortex, some 20 miles or so in diameter may form in the region.   So big, one cannot see its configuration or  recognize what it is from ground level. And it can't be seen, either, as not only much of it is beyond the horizon, it is obscured by fog,  so you would not know what you saw anyway

    At This geologic scale, it will not look like a "bathtub drain whirlpool".  But rather a large rotating circle of water with a calm area in the center.  The fog is generated by the Center as it slowly cools and drops below the surface, surrounding sea level.

    This accounts for "survivor" witness tales of "glass smooth water" and fog. as they were simply, unknowingly, in the middle of it and in no real danger.  The often reported "Curved wall" radar signature and the loss of radio contact characteristic  of these reports would be due to the wall -like edges of the vortex blocking out signals as the center section "sinks", perhaps as much as a MILE below the surface.----The witnesses do not SEE this however, although some report a "bump" or "drop-off" like a "Step" in the sea, before entering the calm area.---One report the witness sees something like a "step" about a meter or so high.  Another described such a step and swears after they crossed it, it began to grow higher "Perhaps a half mile or so high"---He also speculated it could be "Dangerous" (no Sh*t) .   

    So what we have is a 20 mile circle of  rotating water, with a calm area in the center that drops as much as a mile or so below the surface and ALL obscured by fog. It is active for an hour or so and then slows down, the center section rises, the fog clears and all is normal again.  The real danger would be to ships on the outer edge.  They would only see a bank of fog and NOTHING on the radar.---Strange things happen---The compass starts to slowly rotate and even the GYROCOMPASS---as the ship is being, unknowingly, carried around the circle.------In a few cases the ship might simply fall off the edge (end of story)  perhaps a mile or so down and into the sea sediment below. any debris may be smashed, buried or carried far away by underwater currents.---This explains the Frantic SOS reports and sudden loss of signal before the ship vanishes, never to be seen again.

    Airplanes?  This could happen too---Reports have the planes entering a "fog bank" and the radio "cutting out" on them.  What could be happening is the drop of air pressure above the vortex may affect the ALTIMETER making the plane seem HIGHER than it really is---The pilot "Corrects" but puts the plane in the center area, and below the wall---blocking the radio signal.  If he is lucky, the vortex dissipates, he unconsciously re-corrects, the fog clears and conditions are normal again---Or else-WHAM! the plane hits the wall and the pieces fall into the hole.

    Thus this describe and accounts for the Bermuda triangle and its effects---No "dimensional portals" or magnetic vortexes, only NATURAL forces, albeit at a larger scale. It accounts for every reported effect by survivors.   It is just so big it has not been properly described yet.---Even from space it would look like a small cloud of fog.   Not a major threat to marine traffic, unless you sail or fly into it at the wrong time.  A 20 mile circle is quite small given the million square mile expanse of the entire triangle area---so the odds are in the ship's favor.

    Of course we are talking theory here but based on known natural phenomena.  The Sea of Japan area in the pacific also has a similar reputation--- AND has converging currents and a relatively flat bottom a mile or so deep.

    I am a Geologist with an Oceanographic and Environmental background.

  • Jon
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    No, the only weird thing about the 'Bemuda Triangle' modern myth is that so many people believed it. How many multi-engined jet airliners have been lost there? The answer is none. How many full size modern ships? One, known to have been overwhelmed by a hurricane.

    Florida and the Bahamas attract wealthy retired people. Some decide to take up flying light aircraft or small boat sailing or powerboating without previous experience. Novice elderly amateur pilots and skippers do tend to have higher accident rates. There is nothing paranormal about that.

  • No, it's a myth that an unusual amount of airplanes and ships disappear there. .

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.