Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Food & DrinkCooking & Recipes · 1 month ago

Can i sautee a mirepoix and then put the flour over it to make a roux for a bechamel. ?

Or would that ruin it

10 Answers

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  • abdul
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    That sound more like the roux for etouffe

  • 1 month ago

    No, and it’s recommended as the technique used to prep it 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You can--that's how I do chicken pot pie.  I usually saute mirepoix in oil, THEN when that's done add the butter and flour and cook it off.

  • 1 month ago

    that would not ruin it.  

    often in sauces though it is done the opposite way to halt the further cooking of the roux. The vegetables are added and cooked with the roux just long enough to soften them.

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  • kswck2
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You can, but it will be much more 'gluey'. I don't use a mirepoix in a roux, just butter and flour. If using the mirepoix, saute it, remove it, make the roux and add it back. 

    You can also put the mirepoix in cheesecloth and add it to the pot as you add the milk, to flavor it(or put it in the milk ahead of time). 

  • 1 month ago

    Yes you could, but it would be less awkward to reserve the sauteed veggies on the side, make and season your roux and introduce a good part of the milk. Then reintroduce the veggies and add any milk necessary. If this is for Moussaka, it would screw up the dish.

  • 1 month ago

    try it and see?

  • denise
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Well, it could turn out like a béchamel with vegetable mirepoix, a little like a 'gravy' [for biscuits],  it depends what you want / using it for?

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Yes.    If you want your bechamel smooth, blend your mirepoix in the food processor before sauteing.  It's super fast and saves all the chopping by hand.  

     

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    The usual way is to not sauté a morepoix but to summer those same aromatic in the milk in order to flavour it.  You make a roux separately and then strain the flavoured milk into it and discard the aromarics.  You could do it your way but you'd end up using more butter and a lumpy sauce.  You'd throw people by calling it s bechamel.  I think you'd have to invent a new name so that they anticipate the bits and the richness.

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