Anonymous
Anonymous asked in News & EventsOther - News & Events · 2 months ago

In English English, does 'So' at the start of a sentence mean 'And, as a result...'?

8 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    It should but now due to influx of American English it can be used at the start of any sentence whether it is the result of anything or a new random event!

  • JASON
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    It means you're a young person, as this is how they all start a sentence these days.

  • Prince
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    No, it just sounds that Stupid. I've been hearing it a lot.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes. The idea that you cannot use 'so' at the beginning of a sentence in English is absurd. This from Charles Dickens: 

    So I told him that I thought I must have been crying because of my godmother's death and because of Mrs. Rachael's not being sorry to part with me. "Confound Mrs. Rachael!" said the gentleman. "Let her fly away in a high wind on a broomstick!"

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  • 2 months ago

    You cannot start a new paragraph with the word 'and' so 'As a result' suffices.

  • 2 months ago

    --  "Billybean" is correct. In British English the word "so" is not used at the start of a sentence, only after a comma during a sentence.

    --  In American English, they have their own incorrect grammar, therefore they often use "so" at the beginning of a sentence.

  • larry1
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    It's American/ US English.... and yes we use it all the time to mean...'as a result of'.... 

  • 2 months ago

    English English sentences do not begin with the word "So".

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