Are associate's degrees actually useful?

What are the careers one can do with an associate's degree? Do they all take two years to earn? Knowing the love of American education system for breadth instead of depth I wonder how much useful information one can acquire in two years. What can an employer expect of an employee with an associate's degree in something? 

Update:

In other words, do associate's degree holder actually know there profession (major?) to any adequate level or is it just a general education degree with slight leaning towards a particular field?

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  • MS
    Lv 7
    4 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Associate's degrees in vocational subjects are valuable.  They can usually be completed in 2-3 years, and prepare someone for a particular job - veterinary tech, dental hygienist or assistant, medical sonography, paralegal, nursing, etc.  They teach the skills you need to do those jobs.  

    There are associate's degrees in general studies and even in some traditional major fields (criminal justice, English, history, etc).  They are not helpful for getting a job.  The goal of those programs is generally to help a student get general education credits and prepare them for university/college-level work in their subject areas.

    Community colleges also sometimes offer programs in various trades, but you usually don't get an associate's degree with those - you get a certificate or whatever other type of recognition is typical for that program.  This would include carpentry, plumbing, HVAC, mechanics, welding, etc.

  • Anonymous
    4 months ago

    In certain vocational subjects yes.

    Other than that, nowadays, it's just an add on to a bachelors degree. So it is either way useful, yes.

    I went to a community college and earned my associates degree, then transfered to a 4 year college my last 2 years and obtained my bachelors.

  • Anonymous
    4 months ago

    any degree is only as good as its ability to get you a Job

    I have an associate diploma of applied science in Ordnance Engineering and turned down Jobs

  • 4 months ago

    Yes, Associate Degree is useful. Its a 2 years course. There are three types of associate degrees:Associate of Arts (AA), Associate of Science (AS), Associate of Applied Science (AAS).Associate degree holders work as an Air Traffic Controller, Dental hygienist, Registered nurse,  Radiological therapist, Occupational therapy assistant, Computer network support specialist, Web developer, Diagnostic Medical Sonographerand many more. 

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  • Anonymous
    4 months ago

    It really depends on how you use it. I got an associates because I had no clue what I wanted to do out of High School. But after a Psych 101 class, I decided I wanted to go into the mental health field.

    I then transferred to a local in-state University and got my Undergrad. I am now in Grad school and making $45k/year. Not a lot, but for my experience, I'm quite blessed.

    In short, an associates often helps someone explore options while turning into a productive and educated member of society. It's often a stepping stone for a deeper educational career.

    There are also a vast amount of 2 year degrees that allow for someone to enter the working force quickly as well. Especially in the IT and nursing field. My wife is a nurse, and all she has is a 2 year degree.

  • 4 months ago

    Only in the field of nursing. Other than that, it's not really employable with just an Associate's degree in any major, besides nursing. Most students study further to obtain their Bachelor's degrees since employers seek people with higher degrees. With an associate's degree, you won't be able to find a reliable job.

  • drip
    Lv 7
    4 months ago

    A general studies Associate degree for transfer isn’t really good for anything but continuing on at a university to complete a Bachelor degree.

    You can get a two year degree in many areas that will give you a career.  Go on your CC web site page to see all they offer.

  • 4 months ago

    Any knowledge or learned skill has some value.  There are a few jobs that are based on an AA or AS degree/certification. These include things like being an Air Traffic Controller, a Architectural Drafter, Physical Therapy Assistant, Court Reporter, Teaching Assistant, and Dental Hygienist.

    Most AA/AS degrees do not supply enough academic rigor or depth to meet the needs of a professional career tract, which is why so many people who are looking for professional/white-collar jobs get bachelor's degrees.  

  • Scott
    Lv 6
    4 months ago

    An associates degree in auto mechanics, wind turbine maintenance, radiology, or nursing is useful.  And associates in arts transfer degree is only useful if you actually transfer to a university.

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