Ashok asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 2 months ago

What is the difference between constant and uniform acceleration ?

If a body has zero acceleration then it has constant velocity of for example 40 m/s but when a body has a constant acceleration of 2m/s^2 then it has a uniform velocity of 2,4,6,.....m/s for time 1,2,3,....s but when it has uniform acceleration of 2,4,6....m/s^2 then the velocity is non-uniform-2,8,18...m/s for time 1,2,3....s.Then kindly explain the exact difference briefly.

3 Answers

Relevance
  • NCS
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    If you are in a basic physics class, then there is no difference between constant and uniform acceleration. More advanced classes might differentiate between the two.

    .

    "If a body has zero acceleration then it has constant velocity of for example 40 m/s"

    True.

    "but when a body has a constant acceleration of 2m/s^2 then it has a uniform velocity of 2,4,6,.....m/s"

    True, but I'd ditch the word "uniform."

    "but when it has uniform acceleration of 2,4,6....m/s^2 then the velocity is non-uniform-2,8,18...m/s for time 1,2,3....s."

    Yes, BUT -- I don't recall EVER seeing a problem worded this way. Instead, it would read "with a (constant) jerk of 2 m/s²." That would give you a linear (but non-constant) acceleration curve and a parabolic velocity curve.

    Hope this helps!

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    An object subjected to constant acceleration  will see it's velocity increase in a linear (straight line) fashion. However, an object subjected to uniform (or linear acceleration) will see the velocity  increase non linearly, in other words a curve similar to  quadratic or one of the  higher power terms. But remember, just like stocks and shares, acceleration can go down as well as up. The above describes increasing acceleration and not deceleration.

  • 2 months ago

    no, when a body has an acceleration, it does NOT have a constant or uniform velocity.

    the rest of your question is pretty meaningless.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.