Who is forcing colleges to demand gen-eds?

Hopefully this is my last question about gen-eds. Even on this forum there were several askers who were annoyed by the concept. I watched AaronClarey's youtube channel and he, regardless of what you make of his views he does have a following.  I am sure there are plenty of people in the US who would have liked to attend only the classes that are relevant to their major. Also, I have been told here on yahoo answers several times that there is a lot of variation in American universities. My question is, what is preventing at least one university in the whole of America from dropping all gen-ed requirements? There is clearly a demand for it even if not everyone might prefer it. 

Update:

Gigapie☭ How about if I wanted to take only aerospace engineering classes without bloody history or the like?

8 Answers

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  • MS
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    They would likely lose their accreditation if they dropped certain gen ed requirements.  In order to be accredited, colleges and universities must meet certain standards.  Those standards include curriculum standards that apply to the university as a whole.  No one wants a degree from a school that isn't accredited, so losing accreditation would mean losing enrollment. 

  • 1 month ago

    I think you're getting a misimpression regarding general education requirements in the U.S.

    While core curriculum / general education requirements are (almost) ubiquitous in university education in the United States, the number of requirements varies widely. 

    Liberal arts degrees will typically have a lot more distribution requirements than a professional degree like engineering and nursing. Professional and vocational degrees are typically very focused on the subject matter. That will include English composition (and medical math in nursing) but little in the way of social sciences. 

    There are exceptions, of course, so be sure to look at the graduation requirements before you apply to a U.S. university, but I would imagine very few engineering programs require much in the way of history. 

  • drip
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    I hope it is too! 

    No there is not a demand to cut all general education classes. 

    The university would loose their accreditation if they cut all general education classes for a degree. 

    There are community college that offer two year career programs if a student doesn’t want a four year bachelor degree. 

    You may never be able to grasp how and why US universities run. Let it go. 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You don't want a university. You want a vocational school. So go there, take nothing but welding classes, and shut up already.

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  • 1 month ago

    The need for human adults to have some sort of foundation before delving into program-specific classes. I mean, if you can't show proficiency in reading and comprehending texts... all those specific classes are pointless. 

  • John
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    "Hopefully this is my last question about gen-eds."  I hope so, too!  :-)

    "My question is, what is preventing at least one university in the whole of America from dropping all gen-ed requirements?"  As correctly mentioned in another answer, the school would lose its accreditation. Legitimate accrediting agencies ensure there are high academic standards for college students in the US. There would be a mass exodus of students if a college lost its accreditation.  No one wants to hire anyone from an unaccredited school.  

    "There is clearly a demand for it even if not everyone might prefer it."  That demand is from people who want to have their cake and eat it, too.  They are asking for a full college degree, but for only doing a portion of the work required for a degree.  Those same people are good candidates for technical schools, but they insist on the kind of careers reserved for much more highly educated and well rounded students.  Instead of considering the realities of the modern workplace, they insist society and the modern workplace should change to accommodate them.

  • 1 month ago

    If you aren't in favor of colleges and universities with general education requirements, aren't there technical schools to address your needs?

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    The entire purpose of university is to provide a general education.  All graduates need to meet certain standards.  Those who are not interested in general education have options available to them like certifications, trade schools and the like.  Universities shouldn't have to water down their curriculum because whiny students who aren't very bright think it should be job training as opposed to education.

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