Shark
Lv 7
Shark asked in Arts & HumanitiesGenealogy · 2 months ago

Do you believe in Ancestry research?

I heard they tell them what they like to hear nothing else

7 Answers

Relevance
  • Willie
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No, it's a scam like most others.

  • L
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    To a point.  I've tried, for years, looking up ancestor and found a lot of records are just not there at all.  On my father's side - there is a 200-year gap.

  • 2 months ago

    Depends.  DNA testing got a response listing some known nationalities that are not obvious from my name, as well as a couple unexpected but believable.  I tend to accept it.  But when I asked Ancestry.com to find the name of my earliest ancestor sharing my last name to enter the USA, they got mixed up with someone sharing my great grandfather's name, and never answered the question.

  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Researching your ancestry, is done by researching the trail of records each ancestor generated during their lifetime to find out who your ancestors were and where they came from.... so yes I beleive in researching your ancestry........ if you are asking about DNA testing, it is sold to entertain people and that tells you nothing about who your ancesters were or where they came from, people are just entertained

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Expat
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    "Believe in it"? I don't know what you mean here. If you're asking if I trust websites and services that assist in finding your ancestors, I have to say, "yes." I've not used them, but I know people who have, and you can't fake your family tree. Most of what is found is dull and just a string of ordinary people who led ordinary lives and had ordinary children, but sometimes you do some more digging and find out things that are both good and bad or shocking about your ancestors. Who's to say what people want to hear anyway? I think a lot of people would like to find ancestors who had similar interests of careers, but you don't get anything really personal unless you can find news articles or obituaries online. Stories only come from people who knew them, journals and diaries and those aren't online but in people's basements, attics and whatnot. I've traced lines of my family back to the 1500s, and only found a few people that were ever of any note beyond having funny names or more children than I can imagine any one person having. 

  • 2 months ago

    Wrong.  Ancestry provides documentation (records of vital statistic records).  I do not just copy and paste copies of the trees, as I have found many times the information is not correct or cannot be documented.  I always double check the information that someone puts into the trees on line because there are so many people just copy and paste and never check anything  I have numerous binders containing copies of documents that verify my research..

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Who tells researchers what they like to hear?

    How can a census report, birth certificate, baptismal record, marriage license, church membership list, last will and testament, divorce decree, or other documents genealogy researchers seek and find tell them only what they want to hear?

    I suspect there are unscrupulous researchers to convince everyone they're related to historical figures or some such nonsense, but most people learning more about their forebears do the work themselves and accept the truth as recorded in official documents and records.

    I, for instance, have in my tree a professional wrestler who turned to running rigged carnival games when he was too old for the ring. This was not what I like to hear.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.