Do this dark drip watermarks identity a roof leak?

I was told that these watermarks on my roof line identify if there is a roof leak in this location. I don’t understand how a watermark on the outside of the roof can’t identify the roof leak, can someone please explain? I am concerned that roofer isn’t being honest. 

Thank you!

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2 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    the underfelt is missing ..this is placed on the rafters before the lathe and tiles ..in america they still use tarred paper ..50 years behind rest of world ..over here in europe we use a breathable membrane ...zero condensation ..in your case the felt ..or paper has rotted away ..it should overlap the roof and sit in back of gutter ..to prevent the wind from pushing rain out the back of gutter and down your fascia ..as in your case ..this is NOT  roof leak ..its beyond that area ..over here we use either concrete or clay tiles so its simple tp remove/push up and insert a layer to stop it ..not so easy if its those cheap felt tiles 

  • 1 month ago

    a roof consists of two layers -- the [old school] tar paper [modern -- plastic] and the shingles, metal, tiles, etc. that covers the tar paper/plastic underneath.  the tar paper is what actually keeps you dry, the covering [shingles, etc.] is to protect the tar paper from damage.  These small marks indicate that some water, presumably in major storms, has leaked through the covering. As long as you don't have water spots on your ceiling inside the house, the tar paper is doing its job [keeping you dry] just fine.  Is the roof 'leaking'? NOT to the point where you need spend thousands of dollars to replace it. Your roof is perfectly capable of going years or even decades with these drip marks and still keeping the ceiling inside the house dry. Put this guy on your "do not call" list; block his cell number; and spread the word when asked by neighbors to NOT do business with him unless they KNOW they have leaking inside the house.  {After a roofing job is done, priming water spots and then repainting the ceiling is a fine DIY task and, therefore, dirt cheap.}  -- grampa  {I've had far worse drip marks on my house for years and -- no leaks except in a hurricane (which pushed water UP the roof and thus under the shingles -- I primed and repainted).]

    Source(s): direct experience -- I'm in Florida; we know a bit about leaky roofs and heavy rain
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