Tom asked in Society & CultureEtiquette · 1 month ago

Is it sexist to say male nurse instead of nurse? ?

I've been called a 'backwards ****' recently for saying that someone i know used to be a male nurse. Why is it such a big problem? 

16 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Some people will use any excuse to jump all over someone. It's a term from when most nurses were female. My mother graduated from nursing school in 1939, and she used it to refer to the one male in her class. A person could be driven bonkers trying to stay current with all the new and newly deemed inappropriate terms these days. As far as I'm concerned, the bashing of another is far more egregious.

  • Lili
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    There's no need to qualify the word "nurse".  Would you describe someone as a "female doctor"? Why make the distinction with any profession at all? What's the point of it?

    Just say "nurse".

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    A male nurse is like a female soldier it's just funny.

  • 1 month ago

    I see nothing wrong with it if transgenders can call their self something other than what they are so can you

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  • drip
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Why do you need to define their sex instead of just their occupation? 

    Do you define everyone’s occupation first by their sex? Why do you feel the need to prelude their occupation with if they are a male or female? 

    You don’t need to say I knew a guy that was a male nurse. We know if they are a guy they wouldn’t be female.  To say he is/was a a nurse is all that is needed. 

    Being a nurse who is also a male isn’t that uncommon now, ditto for a doctor whose is female. 

    You do sound Sexists and way behind the times 

  • 1 month ago

    With our modern world, many people feel it is unnecessary to assign a gender to a profession.  However, if you are comfortable saying 'male nurse', then do so.

  • 1 month ago

    Presumably the person you're talking to knows you were talking about a man. If so, there was no need to say he was a "male" nurse. Of course he was. Unless he has transitioned to another gender since then, he's still "male". So all you say is, "Robert used to be a nurse"..

    A "male nurse" doesn't do anything differently from a female nurse.

    However, if you were just talking about gender in nursing, but not about this man in particular, it wouldn't be wrong to say, "I knew a male nurse once; he said patients were sometimes surprised at first but they soon learned he was no different from any other nurse".That is a legitimate context in which to say "male nurse".

  • JASON
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    They should have invented a different word. I still refuse to call all actors and actresses just actors.

  • It is sexist because it implies that you assume nurses would be female unless stated otherwise. For similar reasons, many traditionally male occupations have dropped female designators - e.g. actress, WPC, etc.

  • Cogito
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If you've mentioned that this person is a man, why would you add that he used to be a 'male' nurse?  It's highly unlikely that he would ever have been a female nurse, isn't it? 

    If you knew a woman who used to be a plumber, would you say, "Jane used to be a female plumber'?  Would you say, "Bill used to be a male doctor"?  It's simply unnecessary and can sound like you're being sexist.

    And to the answerer who said that it's not possible to be sexist towards a man - of course it's possible.

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