Candice asked in PetsDogs · 1 month ago

Can I correct sibling agression with my dogs or when is it time to find one a new family. ?

When my first dog was about 3 I got her a brother. I got him as a puppy, about 10 weeks old. He is 10 months old now and for the past month hes been very territorial and agressive with my female dog. He goes to attack her if he sees her eatting, if she walks past the closet I keep the toys in (I can no longer keep toys out because if she walks past a toy he goes after her) if someone is giving her attention, or if she goes to get on the couch while he is on it. I've been bitten by him twice breaking up dog fights. My female is not submitting to him at all when he goes to attack her but also never goes after him if hes not trying to attack her. The second time I got bit everything was really calm he was laying down and she went to sit with my niece and he went after her, it really scared me because my niece could have been hurt. I've taken him to the vet, it's not medical, I've talked to trainers, the  quotes I've been getting are a few grand for aggression help which isnt something I can do right now with the pandemic bringing the family to one income. I walk him about an hour every day, he is fully crate trained, and he shows no agression to any other dog besides her. In fact he rolls over on to his back and submits to random dogs he sees. Does anyone have any advice on how to get him to get along with her, hes honestly a sweet boy and I'd hate to give him up. 

Update:

Also I have been feeding them separately, and separating them for play time with toys. Lately they are separated a lot during the day because I'm worried about my dogs safety and my own when he goes after her. 

13 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    • "Can I correct sibling agression with my dogs or when is it time to find one a new family. ?"

    Probably not.

    Bea, the pup I bought in July2012: http://www.pedigreedatabase.com/german_shepherd_do... and her bossy sister, Jo-Jo: http://www.pedigreedatabase.com/german_shepherd_do... got on well at 8½ weeks old, but next time they saw other was about 2 years later, when Jo-Jo won the last of the 8 CCs needed to become a Show Champion. Whenever Bea (pronounced Be-uh) tried to move towards Jo-Jo, Jo-Jo went into aggression mode and soon had to be shut in the van. Jo-Jo's breeder-owners continued showing her until she become a Grand Champion, like their sire - the only father-daughter GSDs I know of in my nation to both gain that title.

    • "When my first dog was about 3 I got her a brother."

    VERY unlikely❗️ A BROTHER will have exactly the same father(sire) and mother(dam) as your 3-years-old bìtch, just as human brothers & sisters do. A half-brother of your bìtch (meaning that they have the same sire - or the same dam, but NOT BOTH parents the same) is a little more possible, but still unlikely.

    • "I got him as a puppy, about 10 weeks old."

    That is the limit I set. It takes at least a fortnight to get the pup settled & SOCIALISED and trusting you before it reaches the 3-months-old stage where inadequately reared/familiarised pups go into a "need security" stage for a month - and STAY in it unless the new owner is wide-awake and continues supplying the experiences & socialisations a pup needs if it is to ever be a confident adult. Pups still with the breeder after 10 weeks old should STAY with the breeder until it has definitely *conquered* that "need security" stage.

    • "He is 10 months old now and for the past month hes been very territorial and agressive with my female dog. He goes to attack her if he sees her eatting, if she walks past the closet I keep the toys in (I can no longer keep toys out because if she walks past a toy he goes after her) if someone is giving her attention, or if she goes to get on the couch while he is on it. I've been bitten by him twice breaking up dog fights."

    💥Q1: Apart from getting bitten trying to control your uneducated brat-pup, what ELSE have you done to avoid this kind of problem?

    💥Q2: What BREED or breed-mix is your bìtch? Is she fertile or neutered?

    💥Q3: And what BREED or breed-mix is your brat-pup?

    To answer these five 💥 questions:

    a: Click the [Edit] under you question, then

    b: click the [Add Update] that will appear, followed by

    c: typing your responses into the clear area that will appear.

    LEARN:

    👺 Pup-owners SHOULD be in a qualified weekly training class for about a year, starting when Pup is 18-to-22 weeks old. I'll bet you haven't been in even ONE session with this brat-pup.

    I suspect that this pup is not only NOT a brother of your bìtch - he is not even from the same breeder!

    👺 NO pooch is allowed on the "humans' " furniture in a sensible household. (1) It gives them an inflated opinion of their own superiority. (2) It places ONTO the furniture the shed body-hairs and particles of dirt that were sticking to the dog's hair. NOT nice for visitors! Keep furry feet on floors!

    • "My female is not submitting to him at all when he goes to attack her but also never goes after him if hes not trying to attack her."

    💥Q4: What DOES she do when he attacks HER?

    💥Q5: What DOES she do when he bites YOU?

    • "The second time I got bit everything was really calm he was laying down and she went to sit with my niece and he went after her, it really scared me because my niece could have been hurt. I've taken him to the vet, it's not medical, I've talked to trainers, the  quotes I've been getting are a few grand for aggression help which isnt something I can do right now with the pandemic bringing the family to one income."

    WRONG thinking. It is YOU that needs to be trained - although the politer word is "coached". YOU have to learn how to be IN CONTROL.

    So YOU drive to the class for about an hour IN the class, being observed, being COACHED on what MOST needs improving about the way you notice things and respond to them. In a well-run dog class with SENSIBLE owners, it is easy to keep at least 6 feet away from other owners & their dogs.

    • "I walk him about an hour every day,"

    Whether YOU walk is for you to worry about. A DOG needs as much movement as it can handle, whether that be walking (BORRRRRING!) or on-leash following a scent trail, or chasing & retrieving whichever is most appropriate of a tennis ball or a dumbbell; or some other activity.

    Without you telling us his BREED, we cannot tell you whether 1 hour is too much at his 10 months age, or too little, or about right.

    In fine weather: As of about 4½ weeks old my German Shepherd Dog pups are OUTSIDE all day, starting on the top of the 4 levels in their enclosed 1/8th acre hillside, then pushing one another off the top level (which is higher than the ceilings in the house) to scrabble until they land on whichever of the lower 3 levels is below that part of the top level. After the rest of the litter have left at (or close to) 8 weeks old, my retention gets picked up at 10+ weeks (to give the first vaccination time to start waking the immune system), has a lightweight slip-chain (with a 6 foot flat leash attached) placed on its neck, is carried down my steep driveway to the street then placed on the ground - and tries to return to the yard it KNOWS. But my leash halts it. I then start a VERY slow procession to get past 5 houses and reach the corner. It involves repeatedly crouching and calling Pup to me while gently but firmly hauling Pup towards me. When it reaches me I praise it & make a fuss of it then step to the end of the leash and start all over again. By the time we reach the start of "my" cul-de-sac, almost all pups suddenly realise that there are interesting NEW smells all around, so start willingly exploring. It takes about half an hour for us to reach the suburban shopping centre, where I sit on a bench for a while, with pup behind my legs watching the pedestrians & cars & buses go past. And then I start the return home - MUCH easier than passing the 5 houses each side of "my" cul-de-sac about an hour earlier.

    • "he is fully crate trained,"

    Big deal. My dogs mostly sleep in their individual pens outside (see photo), but are "house-clean" when inside. They don't get crate trained until they are due to fly to a stud.

    • "and he shows no agression to any other dog besides her. In fact he rolls over on to his back and submits to random dogs he sees. Does anyone have any advice on how to get him to get along with her, hes honestly a sweet boy and I'd hate to give him up."

    Even ones SMALLER than him? Sounds as though you have a weirdo, and MIGHT have to let your bìtch beat him up while she is still bigger than him and has power that he hasn't grown yet. ANSWER my 5 questions so we get a better idea of the situation. And if you currently have more than these 2 dogs, tell us about the others (AGE, BREED or breed-mix, GENDER, and whether fertile or neuter).

    • "Updated 4 days ago: Also I have been feeding them separately, and separating them for play time with toys. Lately they are separated a lot during the day because I'm worried about my dogs safety and my own when he goes after her."

    I suggest that it would be more productive to TETHER him so he can't possibly reach HER, but SHE can reach HIM if she feels the need. Their dishes need to be visible to both pooches, but HE can't reach hers (because of the chain). She then gets her dish just before he gets his - EVERY MEAL.

    Let him work out that he is #3, NOT the Boss, not even #2. That is demonstrated by such as him having to wait until last before getting HIS meals, and by NOT being free to charge at HER & her dish. And remember that NILIF tells you that you don't even put it where he can reach it until he obeys at least 1 - preferably 2 with only a breath in between - command(s) in a row.

    And GET BOOKED IN TO THAT WEEKLY TRAINING CLASS so that YOU get help in working out how to eventually bring him under verbal control. I hope your dogs are NOT muscular mastiffs!

    Here's hoping for some useful INFORMATION from you in about 22 hours (my nation is "last stop before Antarctica", so in a very little while my computer's clock will jump forward 1 hour, damnit. Yep - it just did).

    King Les The Lofty - first pup in 1950, GSD trainer & breeder as of Easter 1968

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  • 1 month ago

    I'm going to leave you with one word ....NILIF... google it.

    Look at what everyone is saying about resource guarding and then look up NILIF and work with it.

    Get the little thug off the sofa's and on to the floor and put some boundaries and NILIF in practice and you'll see a difference.

  • 1 month ago

     nope... But you can try

  • 1 month ago

    You might have to give one away, or just keep them totally separate

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  • PR
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If you have children in your house sometimes, it might be a good idea to take the younger dog to an animal rescue league, who can then rehome him as an only dog. Of course, he should be neutered, but each dog is different in how it responds to things around it. You will need to determine how serious this is and then take the proper action at that point, and it might be better to do that before he gets more aggressive and then you have additional concerns for rehoming him. 

    Are they both spayed/neutered? Unneutered dogs may be a bit more aggressive.

  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    He is not 'agressive' he is untrained and resource guarding AND at an age where he is a 'teenage thug' , you have a strange thought they are not 'siblings', they are part of a pack and fighting because they are trying to achieve pack order and you are not helping in the slightest by treating them as if they were little humans, they are NOT, they are dogs a different animal species to humans and you have to respect them as such.......... lots you can do even now and ALL is about you respecting them as DOGS, dogs which live in a pack and need to be taught ALL humans regardless of how small are above them in the pack, ALL humans own ALL resources and they get NOTHING unless they behave.... really simple things you can do which will make a difference, but that means changing your thinking and behaviour

    NILIF https://k9aro.webs.com/nilif.htm use from now, every day, for everything.

    In the world of dogs, top dogs get best sleeping position, so no allowing dogs on furniture or beds, dogs sit/lay on the floor, allowing a dog/s like this to be on furniture/beds will just increase their status in the pack ( of dogs/humans), put a lead on the teenage thug and let it trail, that way you can step on the lead, or lift the lead and are in control without touching the dog and getting bit, you can lift the lead and walk away from furniture if he is on it so he is forced to get off without issue and as he jumps off you use a command word, like 'off' or 'floor' drop the lead and sit down yourself.... clearly showing him you are in charge and above him in the pack... simple things that cost nothing but time and a change of your behaviour/thinking. The lead gives you control which means both dogs can eat in the same room, you holding the lead and being pack leader to stop him attacking/her defending.......... although I would suggest ( even though I can't see them but you have a submissive male) your older dog being resident dog and female  is more likely to be  more involved in setting up these fights than you are aware

    You say with other dogs he is submissive and he is submissively reactive ( not aggressive)  in the home as he hasn't a clue where he fits in the pack...no one ( YOU) told him the rules and no one told the other older dog  where her place in the pack is either, so they are fighting each other for pack higherachy and neither respect you, eg 'top dog' gets best sleeping/resting position and once they get it they will fight to keep that status, humans furniture/beds are the best sleeping/resting position and by allowing them on you are telling them they are equal or above humans and they are not, so not allowing them on gives them a very clear message about their status and all the humans in the households status...which means you need to step up  and be pack leader and treat her exactly the same way as well, respect and treat them AS DOGS and not little humans.

  • 1 month ago

    They are not 'siblings' and he is not her brother.   For starters.   It's rather unusual for the b itch not to be the lead dog there although since both were neutered when only young (too young imo for the male especially - the growth plates should have been allowed to close) you have altered the normal situation.   What breeds because there are some that live together better than others, although again normally the bitches 'rule'.   Males don't normally attack females, and especially given her age vs his.   Females normally put males in their place, BUT as she was spayed this may not happen.  Spayed females do tend to be submissive and actually so should castrated males.   This is from my experience with my breed ONLY.

    You may be looking at resource guarding, as already suggested and for this, you will either have to work out what sets all this off with the male, or unfortunately return him to his breeder for her to rehome, or rehome him youself.   As the only dog of either sex, in any new home.  It goes without saying that this young hoologan should NOT be biting you, any more than going for your older female.

     

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    naughty dogs do well with some basic training.

  • Amber
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    As you've taken him to a vet I'm assuming he is all ready neutered, otherwise the vet should have recommended it. If not, then that is the first step, it's even more important if you have a female obviously.

    As you say, right now, hiring a trainer isn't really an option. I don't think it's aggression more guarding what he thinks is his, and as far as he's concerned everything in the house and what comes into it is his.

    I would recommend increasing his exercise to 2 hours a day and add in some mental simulation. Boredom breaker toys are something to look into when he's in is crate or in another room. 

    It's going to be hard work and time consuming to keep them apart. I'm not a fan of crating and so in past I have literally cut my house in half with a baby gate. One dog stays on side and one on the other and I rotate so each dog gets some family time. Crating can actually cause aggressive behaviour in some dogs and can cause guarding. I also don't like to crate my dogs when people come over because I want them to have that experience. Dogs don't like to be shut in small spaces and it's against their instincts. Teaching bite inhibition and impulse control is another good thing to look into.

    Re-homing may be a possibility if you still can't afford any training in a few months. If this is the start of true aggression it will only get worse as he gets older. And although he bit you during a fight and it may have been accidental or on reflex you need to be extra careful. You also consider muzzling him when you have to have them together for any reason.  

    I am not a vet or a trainer. So read my comment and take what you want from it.

  • 1 month ago

    Thank you e. h. Amos for some advice, he is neutered, he got fixed at 6 months and so did my female. I will definitely look into resource guarding, thank you. 

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