Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsRodents · 2 months ago

Can bacteria grow in sterile water?  What is the difference between sterile water and distilled water?

3 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    By definition bacteria cannot grow in sterile water because if the water contains bacteria it is not sterile.

    If you took a sealed container of sterile water and inoculated it under aseptic conditions with bacteria and resealed it and nothing else got in the bacteria could not grow because the sterile water would contain none of the nutirents that they require.

    Sterile water is water free of all microorganisms, both vegetative and spores.

    Distilled water is formed by repeatedly boiling water and then allowing it to condense. It is free from minerals such as calcium. The water boils and the steam formed is condensed (i.e. cooled) into a separate container. Therefore, minerals dissolved in the water at the start remain in the original container.

  • Ted K
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Sure. Sterile just means there are no live bacteria or other organisms in there to start with.  BUT, unless you add the bacteria along with substrates they can live off, then they won't grow.

    IOW: sterile water + peptone + salt + yeast extract + bacteria--> growth

    sterile water + only bacteria--> no growth

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Sterile water has been treated with heat and or chemicals to kills everything in it, but all the dead bits might still be there.  Distilled water is evaporated water and then condensed.  It leaves all the bits behind which cannot evaporate including most minerals, but not all chemicals.  As for bacteria growing in sterile water, only if the container is opened and bacteria gets in, and even then, only if there is no longer a chemical preservative inhibiting bacterial growth, and again, only if there are bits in there for it to live off of, so it would be highly unlikely unless it is contaminated somehow. 

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