Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 4 weeks ago

Why the 14th century (1300s) is often considered the best century to live in medieval Europe?

26 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Because of the Black Death which occurred right in the middle of the fourteenth century, circa 1349 to 1351. Around the year 1350 approximately half of the population of Europe died. This made conditions much easier for the survivors. Many blamed the Jews because, during this same period, the Exilarchy, which had been removed from Damascus to the "New City" of Bagdad when it was built specifically with the intention of absorbing the population overflow from Damascus, had just completed the Talmood. The Talmood, also spelled Talmud, was written during the nineteen and a half centuries between 598 BC and 1350 AD. The Exilarchs had presided over the college of Geonim or Gaonim as they compiled that massive work and, as they were completing it, they leased a principality called Tmutotokhan on the little Sea of Azoff off of the Black Sea. Then the Exilarchs and their Geonim hired a Genowese shipping company to transport them all to Europe. This led to the accusation that they had intentionally imported the Persian rats whose fleas caused the Black Plague. However, if we examine this accusation, it falls apart. It présupposes that, Europe had been a sterile isolated bubble beforehand. That flies in the face of the constant flow of people to and from Europe during the Crusades and, obviously, the usual shipping routes and trade with the Genowese anyway. After half of the Europeans died in about 1 year, there was a great redistribution of wealth. And labour was more scarce, which gave the serfs and peasants some leverage in bargaining. 

    Source(s): Vive Saint Roche
  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    No, the 1200s (and 1100s). The 1300s was actually one of the worst medieval centuries ever.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Was it? I have never heard of this claim. Could you please cite your source.

  • Ann
    Lv 6
    3 weeks ago

    Sure! The Plague killed a 4th of the population slowly and painfully because there were no drugs to help. There was no sanitation to speak of. People worked long and hard everyday just to survive. There was no time to have fun. Most couldn't read or write and were destined to be poor forever. What we know of Medieval Europe has been romanticized. 

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Black plague claimed around 75,000,000-200,000,000 people lives worldwide. 25,000,000-50,000,000 within Europe alone.

  • 3 weeks ago

    One European historian I read said of this century that the peasant had it made compared to today because they only had to till their fields for the summer and collect the bountiful harvest. The local government would collect taxes afterwards and the rest of the autumn and winter was just spent with family and friends. No work necessary for that time period. The rent on the farm was collected in the fall also with the regular taxes. Owning a farm wouldn't be allowed for some time yet. What a deal!

  • John P
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Maybe best for several matters, but not concerning the Black Death. That plague killed far more people in  proportion to the overall population than the Spanish Flu of 1918/20, and than Covid-19 looks likely to kill at the present time.

    The Black Death killed about one third to one half of the population in most parts of Europe. That did, however, give power to those ordinary workers who survived, because their services were far more valuable, with fewer people to work the land etc.

    Anon is clearly unaware of the dates of the period which some historians call the Dark Ages.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Ah yes, the Dark Ages are considered among the best to live in ... you know, the dark happiness days ... lol.

    This is clearly abuse of the word "why" ... lol.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Famine of 1315-1317 claimed possibly 7.5 million lives. Black plague 1340s-1350s claimed around 25 million to 50 million Europeans, wiping out 30-60% of the population of Europe.. Hundred years war, began wiping out a few million more in France and in England.

  • 4 weeks ago

    The Black Death would beg to differ. 

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