Ethan asked in Arts & HumanitiesPhilosophy · 4 weeks ago

Why do I feel more empathy towards animals that lack human characteristics?

Everyone's the other way around, dogs are their favorite animal, but I always found fish and bugs to be way cuter, even though I've been surrounded by more human animals my whole childhood. I could never bring myself to eat fish, even when it's a small impersonal cube of meat on a plate, it rubs me the wrong way to see my favorite animals dead on a tray of ice to be picked out like a head of lettuce because they "don't look like a human." I've never had a problem eating beef or chicken even though I grew up with cows and chickens around me, so why do I center on the less expressive animals when I should be conditioned otherwise?

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  • j153e
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago
    Favorite Answer

    Perhaps as a child growing up you incorporated the "utilitarian" or practical values of your parents re beef and chicken.  And, as a child you also naturally emotionally and with compassion identified with '''the little guy," in your natural world the fish, the butterflies, lady bugs, and so on.

    Related:

    Understanding Yourself by Mark Prophet.

    p.s.  Empathy is a widely considered topic in philosophy:  https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/empathy/

    https://iep.utm.edu/emp-symp/

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    thAT'S NOT A PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUE, IT'S A PSYCHOLOGICAL ONE. LEARN THE DIFFERENCE AND THEN GO ASK IN THE PSYCHOLOGY  FORUM. 

    Source(s): t
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