? asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 2 months ago

The meaning of this sentence?

Indeed all the great Masters have understood, that there cannot be great art without the little limited life of the fable, which is always the better the simpler it is, and the rich, far-wandering, many-imaged life of the half-seen world beyond it.

what does this sentence mean by saying "and the rich, far-wandering, many-imaged life of the half-seen world beyond it.?"

1 Answer

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  • 2 months ago

    The sentence is easier to understand if you ignore the added part "which is always better the simpler it is ... "

    Without that addition, the sentence says:

    > Indeed all the great Masters have understood, that there cannot be great art without the little limited life of the fable, and the rich, far-wandering, many-imaged life of the half-seen world beyond it.

    The sentence means that great art depends on two things

    1) The little limited (and simple) life of the fable

    - and -

    2) The rich life of the half-seen world beyond the fable.

    It contrasts

    1) The life of the fable (which is limited and little and simple)

    - compared to  -

    2) The life beyond the fable (which is rich (not simple), far-wandering (not limited) and many-imaged (not little)

    This rich life "beyond the fable" is only "half seen."

    It is not explicitly described in the fable itself.

    But we understand that it must be there in that fable world, providing the infrastructure and the background for the fable's little, simple, limited story.

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