Are the following sentences grammatically correct?

 I cooked meal to my aunt.

 I prepared meal to my aunt.

10 Answers

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    No...neither is right.

    I cooked a meal FOR my aunt.

    I prepared a mean FOR my aunt.

    Both are correct. 'Cooked' is more often used in American English.

    To be more exact, 'cooked ' means use of heat. 'Prepared' more appropriate for a fresh salad. No heat involved.

    Source(s): Native American English speaker.
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    No, it is for not to

  • 1 month ago

    No           .

  • 1 month ago

    I cooked a meal for my aunt. ('Cooking" means using heat.)

    I prepared a meal for my aunt. (Maybe you cooked it, but maybe it didn't need to be cooked.)

    Simpler:

    I made a meal for my aunt. (A simple verb, much more usual than "prepare".)

    Again, it might mean you cooked a meal, or it might mean the meal didn't need to be cooked.

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    No. Meals (foods) are cooked for, not to, a person.

  • 1 month ago

    Oh, Peaceful.  Keep trying, it will come to you eventually.

    "I cooked A meal FOR my aunt".  you could say prepared a meal for your aunt, especially if the meal was cold and not cooked, like sandwiches, perhaps.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I cooked a meal for my aunt. (not 'to')

    I prepared a meal for my aunt. (Note: 'a meal' in both sentences.)

    'Prepared' is more formal than 'cooked'.

    If you cooked several meals then: "I cooked meals for..."

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    No, neither of those are grammatically correct

  • 1 month ago

    No:

    I cooked a meal for my aunt.

    I prepared a meal for my aunt. 

  • 1 month ago

    No, neither is correct.

    You could say "I cooked a meal for my aunt" or "I prepared a meal for my aunt".

    'A meal' is a non-specific meal. The noun 'meal' requires the indefinite article.

    If you are talking to someone else about a particular meal, you could say "I cooked the meal for my aunt" or "I prepared the meal for my aunt."

    Some meals have a name of their own, such as 'breakfast' or 'dinner'. In that case you could say,   "I cooked dinner for my aunt" or "I prepared dinner for my aunt".

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