Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsChemistry · 1 month ago

The H3O+ ion is called the what?

I thought it was Hydronium, but according to my professor, it's incorrect.

Was I supposed to label it Hydronium 'ion,' or am I fully incorrect?

3 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    I think he is being pedantic.  Ask him if there is a "Hydronium" that is not an ion?  If hydronium, of itself, must be an ion, then the use of the word "ion" with the word hydronium is actually redundant.  Only a pedant, a nitpicker, would call the one incorrect and require the redundant form.  Look at how frequently the term "hydroxide" is used without saying "ion" as a valid comparison.  He knows exactly what you mean and there is no possible confusion or ambiguity, so it is not wrong.

    But that is my opinion, and I have gotten into trouble with other scientists for this same sort of disagreement.  It turns out (surprise, surprise) that scientists generally don't like being called pedants, especially when they are.

  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    In chemistry, hydronium (hydroxonium in traditional British English) is the common name for the aqueous cation H 3 O +, the type of oxonium ion produced by protonation of water

    Source(s): wikipedia
  • 1 month ago

    Pure water contains larger amounts of hydronium, [H3O+], ions than hydroxide, [OH-], ions. Pure water contains equal amounts of hydroxide, [OH-], and hydronium, [H3O+], ions. Pure water contains equal amounts of hydroxide, [OH-], and hydronium, [H3O+], ions.

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