The sizes of cells in living organisms on Earth has been shown to be governed by the strength of the gravitational field.?

The sizes of cells in living organisms on Earth has been shown to be governed by the strength of the gravitational field near the Earth's surface. In animal cells, a maximum diameter of 10 µm can be attained before auxilliary scaffold-like structures are needed to maintain the structural integrity of the cell. In our solar system, Jupiter's moon Europa (mass 4.80 ✕ 10^22 kg, radius 1560 km) and Saturn's moon Enceladus (mass 1.08 ✕ 10^20 kg, radius 252 km) are thought to have global oceans under a thick layer of surface ice. Because of tidal heating by the planets they orbit, these moons may have all of the necessary ingredients for life. If microbial life were to have developed on Europa and Enceladus, and cell size scales linearly with the strength of the gravitational field, what is the maximum size (in µm) that Europan and Enceladean cells can attain without needing scaffold-type support?

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