Looking at LPN for a career, but worried it's a dying field?

*I'm not able to become a registered nurse.

So keep hearing that LPNs are being displaced by RNs. I just don't want to waste time/money on a job that will be phased out e.g in a decade. Any personal experience appreciated, thank you.

11 Answers

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  • edward
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Can’t become an RN...why the heck not?  Become an LPN, those are who we are currently hiring at the hospital because they cost less than the BN’s (no RN’s around).  You could always bridge from LPN to BN later.  LPN is like 2 years?  After you take the required course bridging to BN is another 2?  I didn’t bridge i went straight to BSN.  You can work and get your degree at the same time, not to mention working with countless BN’s who can give you tips

  • 3 months ago

    I think you are looking a bit TOO far ahead. If there is a field you can enter now, that will provide a decent income, you should enter it--you don't know what things will actually be like in 10 years, and a field you can work in right now is NOT a waste of time OR money. Is there some reason you can't become an RN later?  

    Don't make the mistake of thinking that the career you choose now is the career you will always have, either. That's not necessarily true. Things change. 

  • 3 months ago

    If you cannot become an RN, what makes you think you can become LPN? Have you checked that out? Yes, LPNs are being phased out a lot of places, and you might not have much future. Growing numbers of nursing jobs require BSN, or even MSN. Education requirements in many fields are being upgraded.

  • 3 months ago

    She asked a straight forward question.  If you don't have anything to contribute, then you are just here to make noise.

    To those of you questioning OP's statement about not able to become a registered nurse, it's none of your business why. It could be financial reasons, grades to get into the schools, family obligations. The important thing is that she wants to work and is willing to get qualifications to do so.  I wish more people were like that.

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  • 3 months ago

    LPNs are still used in home care situations, injection clinics, wound care clinics, nursing homes, other clinics, etc; just not as many acute care in house positions,

  • ?
    Lv 6
    3 months ago

    It's been my my opinion for all of my career that nobody knows what the job market will be like in 10 years, and that continually upgrading your skills is a way of life for anyone who wants to stay ahead.

    What that means is, you don't have to pick something that you think is going to exist as a career forever.  Pick something that is in demand now (such as LPN).  Then every year or two, take another college or trade school class to start slowly working your way toward the next tier of career tracts out there. Then as the job market changes, you'll be well prepared to change with it.

  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    Yes, you are correct that LPNs are being phased out of hospitals but there will always be a place for them in nursing homes.  Unfortunately the pay is terrible.

  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    There will always be a need for cheaper labor in health care. 

    But since it's only two years to become an RN, there are a lot of people going that route.  

    RNs with two year degrees have twice as much education and a much broader scope of practice than an LPN. 

    RNs with a BSN are even more valuable than RNs with two year degrees.

    Why can't you become an RN?

  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    While not an LPN or RN, I do work in the health care industry.  Yes, LPNs are being phased out.  Over the last 2 years we've cut 30% of our LPNs and I believe the rest of the industry is doing the same.

    There are CNAs which is similar to the LPN in function and they make about 10k less on average, about 29k/annually.  Which is why most health care organizations are phasing out the LPNs when the CNA can do the work for cheaper.  RNs, btw, make double what the CNAs do on average.

  • R P
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    I do not understand why you cannot become an RN.

    There will always be a need for nurses.

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