? asked in Consumer ElectronicsCameras · 2 months ago

Will 10 megapixels be good in a future?

13 Answers

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  • 3 weeks ago

    I've seen magazine quality photos taken with a Nikon D40 that only has 6MP ...

  • 2 months ago

    There is no rush to do anything. Digital cameras are only going to get better and better, and prices are going to keep dropping in terms of what one gets for the money.

    My own work does not require speed, and so I bought the 1DsII when the 1DsIII came out, saving myself over three thousand dollars.

    I now look at the Canon 5D II as well as other digital cameras, and, although I feel the tug to buy, I know that there is absolutely no rush. Those cameras that are presently considered top of the line will soon be second or third best again in their own product line.

    I do shoot film as well, however, and so I picked up some older Hasselblad equipment for very little. I will enjoy working with the Hassy, but I know that most of my shots will continue to be made with a digital camera.

    When will I need another digital camera? Maybe never. Mine are all still functioning perfectly, even my old 5 MP Olympus E-20 that I bought seven years ago. Claims about digital obsolescence are vastly overstated.

    --Lannie

  • 2 months ago

    I guess no. It's not good for future.

  • 2 months ago

    Well, it will be a standard in the upcoming 2-3 years and will be for another 3-5 years. 

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  • 2 months ago

    It's good enough for me forever. 

  • keerok
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I have a 5MP dSLR that's still very much used these days.

  • ?
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    depends how big your picture is , 10 megpixel is ok for upto a 8x10 picture , larger the picture the more the pixels ..18 meg will do for a picture , main thing is the size or the sensor . standard 1/4 inch will give you good shots upto 8x 10 , 1/2 inch sensor will give you a 12x16 inch picture , the you have full frame tort gives you a professional picture . 

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Your question is vague because you do not mention who's future or their needs.  If all you do is post to social media, then you'll never need more than 2MP.  If you make prints no larger than about 8"x10", then 10MP is going to be good enough for you.  But if you need to make larger prints, then 10MP will not be good enough.  If you crop heavily into your shots, 10MP will not be good enough.

    The only reason for having concern for the megapixels is to:

    1) Make larger prints and/or crop heavier into the image.

    2) Get more resolution out of your high-end lenses.  At only 10MP (probably on a phone since no real camera only has 10MP), you'll be hard pressed to find a lens that DOES NOT out resolve the sensor.  Meaning that the sensor can't record the details coming from the lens.  At higher MP counts like 40-50MP, then you can run into situations where the sensor out resolves the lens, but not at only 10MP.

    So will 10MP be good enough for the future?  Depends who's future we're talking about and their needs.  It could very well be that 10MP was never good enough, even in the past.

  • Newton
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Well it is good enough for most people right now or in the future. But since consumers equate pixel count with image quality, they are unlikely to buy a 10 mp camera. Camera makers will therefore not make cameras that consumers will not buy. I myself still own a few DSLR cameras that have less than 10mp, and they are good enough for me, even though I also own one that has 20mp. 

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    What kind of future would you like, and how long? 10 megapixels is a little bigger than 4K video and will make good 8x10 prints, so it'll cover what most consumers are realistically going to need for a while. The latest iPhone 12 cameras are 12 megapixels.

    But if you're ready for an 8K world or want to operate at the pro level, you need more than 30 megapixels.

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