Anonymous

Should I move on to a different job even when my supervisor asked me to stay? ?

So I was offended a new job at a law firm. 

I had told my supervisor that I'll be leaving in about three weeks. 

However, my supervisor asked me is there anything that would make me stay because I'm one of the best referral clerks that meets my goals on average. 

I just told her no. I said I respect our firm because it's one of Los Angeles most prestigious firms but I would like to do something more tailored to my skills and that doesn't require a quota. 

She said she understood but to reconsider leaving. 

This new job doesn't require a quota at all. That's like the number one thing I look for in a job now because these quotas can drive you crazy. 

Should I reconsider staying at my current job? 

Update:

SumDude, 

That was autocorrect. 

Also, I'll be working with the call center division of the law firm, so I won't be working with any lawyers. 

Update 2:

SumDude,

The new firm doesn't require a quota like my current job. 

We're not gonna be working in conjunction with a service company. 

8 Answers

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    If you are the person who keeps asking questions about unrealistic expectations, supervisors saying the numbers don't look good, reasons why a lawyer on the list may not be able to take a case, etc., then don't stay at that job.  Move on.

    But don't do it because I said so.  I have a conflict of interest: I want you to change jobs so that there won't be any more questions about the job you have now.  I want you to move on.  So that is probably affecting my judgment.  Therefore, you should ask someone who doesn't care.

  • Eva
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    You've been complaining about  your current job for months. It's time for you to move on since you've found another position. Hope you will be happier with your new job.

  • 2 months ago

    Sounds to me like you've already considered AND reconsidered. Go to your new job, and thank your supervisor the kind remarks. Don't feel guilty about it either. 

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You have nothing to lose by reconsidering. However, that doesn't mean you are obliged to stay either.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Move on to the new job.  It always works that way; when you give notice is when all of a sudden you're valuable to the company, and your current employer asks you to stay.  But you clearly don't like your current job with meeting quotas, so take the new one.

  • 2 months ago

    Why would you possible consider staying in a job you said you don't like multiple times in your question?  

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Yes, untiil you learn to proofread your own work and type OFFERED correctly. Lawyers demand exacting words and spelling.  Then take the new job.  EDIT - so quit relying on autocorrect. And without quotas at the new firm how will you know when you reach your goals? What new skills will you be using ?   But as I said, take the new job.

  • 2 months ago

    Hi, we're random strangers on the internet.  We know nothing about you or your job.  Perhaps, just perhaps, we're not the best people to be talking to about your career and your entire future.  Do what you think is right.

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