Chances of dying from COVID?

I am male, 22 years old, 6 ft 5 inches, 295 pounds. My BMI is 30. I have no underlying conditions that I know of. What are the chances of me dying from Covid 19? I stress about this virus day and night due to having a baby on the way. I’m looking forward to spending my life with her and my wife and this Covid just keeps reminding me my life could end soon. I wear masks, wash my hands, sanitize, etc. 

Update:

I added in my height and weight because I know obesity plays a factor in severe cases 

Update 2:

Update: race is white male. From LA 

10 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    In reality, you have perhaps a 3-4% chance of catching it and, should you catch, it you'll have between a 1-2% chance of dying from it. 

  • ?
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    No way to know

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    there's no telling who is going to be seriously impacted by Covid and who will just have a mild or moderate case.  Follow the guidelines about wearing masks, and don't mingle with people outside of your home

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    your chances are slim to none

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  • Marc
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You risk of SURVIVAL in your category is 99.995%. You are more likely to die driving your car, crossing the street, having a bad drug reaction...almost ANYTHING. Turn off the news and social media.

  • Tavy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    hang on in there, we are getting the vaccine in the next few weeks in the UK. Your turn soon.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You do not state your actual fitness. 6'5" 295 pounds is a BMI of 35.0 and not 30.

    https://www.smartbmicalculator.com/

    Stand tall out of the shower without clothes and pinch at your sides at belly height. Over 1 inch is overweight.

    Although you could be muscular and large boned, if anywhere around average structure, you need to eat fewer Calories and increase vegetables and decrease fats and empty carbs and fried foods.

    That aside, Wearing masks, keeping clean, trying to keep distance especially in any large group, does state that not only does it reduce chances of infection, it also reduces the chance of serious illness. What we have is a pandemic out of control because of bad leadership and people refusing to take basic steps to not spread it. If wearing cloth reusable masks, be sure to wash them daily so have many extras.  

    Statistically, your odds are less than 1% of getting seriously ill.

    Adjust your eating habits if not muscular and consider what you are eating and drinking. Cut back on sweet and salt. Even artificial zero cal tends to cause weight gain. Find flavored seltzers with no sweeteners at all like La Croix or similar if you like carbonation. If its beer and alcohol, cut back on drinking.

    Make sure you get vitamins daily.  Keep away from unmasked people if possible. If you and your partner don't contact many people, things should be OK. 

    This is a special time. We'd like to get back to normal if people would all just follow the rules. It is suggested you get a seasonal flu shot. If you get the seasonal flu, you do enter at at risk for COVID-19. 

    1/3 of people are not taking this serious enough and 1/3 are over-worried. There is even a chance you already have contracted it without symptoms and are immune now, at least for a while. It's 5 to 10 times more serious than a seasonal flu, but isn't highly deadly to generally healthy people eating right. 

  • Rick B
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Your risk is extremely low.  You did not list your race.  I am seeing overweight Hispanics being more severely impacted than others.  Those with HTN or diabetes seem to have a rougher course as well.

  • 2 months ago

    Use logic. The virus is from bats and you can only catch it from bats or eating bats. So technically it’s supposed to be near impossible to get.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    If you end up catching it, probably about 1 in 10,000-50,000. Don't worry.

    https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid_weekly/in...

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