Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Consumer ElectronicsCameras · 1 month ago

Will camera companies be making camera solutions for the smartphone industry?

12 Answers

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  • 2 weeks ago

    Probably to make more money.

  • 1 month ago

    Likewise, neither everybody can manage the cost of a DSLR nor does everybody know how ... Purchaser Behavior Driven Smartphone Camera Technology ... time in the versatile business as a clamor decrease arrangement in pictures. ... Man-made reasoning advances additionally have started having an effect in cell phone cameras.

  • 1 month ago

    Probably to make more money.

  • keerok
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Dedicated cameras offer varying levels of control for creating a photo to allow the photographer to capture an image as he envisions it. Smartphone cameras on the other hand aim to make whatever scene is in front of it look as clear as possible on screen for an app to capture it. This is one reason why the point-and-shoot camera relinquished its hold on beginner photographers. The phone makes everything easier.

    Given those, camera manufacturers will continue making cameras the way they do. Even with the new generation of point-and-shoot cameras, the focus is still on control. The mere fact that someone who doesn't know much about photography but buys an expensive Sony RX100 instead of depending on his phone is already controlling the size of the sensor he prefers to shoot with. Those in the know understand fully that given an adept camera, they can get far much better photos than any smartphone out there. 

    So why not put the automated technology of smartphones in a camera? They already did and continue doing it. Samsung showed the camera-world how to make a smartcamera and then dropped out from the race completely. Sony integrated smart features to some of its models. Nikon and Canon are making it easier for users to connect their cameras to a network or the internet already. Cameras are evolving.

    The other way around is a bit more difficult. The trend with phones is to make them smaller and thinner to the point of bending and flexing them. Real cameras need bulk and space for its parts, some still mechanical. Blame Physics for those needed dimensions to make it better but don't worry. Engineers will always find a way. If they can get away with aperture-less (no iris whatsoever) phone cameras then will they be able to do away with anything else?

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Sony already do (sort of) but I doubt anyone else will - it would need a huge investment and there'd be no guarantee of breaking even, much less making a profit.  Sony, OmniVision, Toshiba and SK Hynix have got the lion's share of the market and they're not likely to lose it.

  • Sumi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    No one but the executives of these companies know the future plans for the camera industry.

    It's no secret that smartphones were initially ignored by most, if not all, of the manufacturers.  Their arrogance led to them to sit on their laurels (I'm talking to you Nikon & Canon) as the consumer camera market was annihilated by the then world's largest camera manufacturer, Nokia and especially Apple.

    Few companies have made smartphone solutions, Hasselblad introduced an add-on lens for smartphones that were any good.  There are quite a few add-on lenses by other brands: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/add-on-lenses-f...

    I think instead of capitulating to the smartphone market, the remaining camera manufacturers (Samsung & Olympus quit the camera business in 2019 & 2020 respectively)may make their cameras more like smartphones.  Nikon & Sony have introduced tech that allows the camera to connect with a smartphone and automatically upload images to the cloud.  This is a good first step, and I think things will get better because, well, they have to if these companies want to continue to be relevant.

    Instead of making gear for the smartphone market, the manufacturers might actually make their camera adaptable to the smartphone.  Having an open-source firmware, having apps designed for their mirrorless cameras will allow users to use their cameras more like they do phones.

    Just like the battle between Beta vs VHS where the inferior VHS won the war due to the overwhelming availability of movie rentals, it seems that the vastly superior point-and-shoot digital cameras will succumb to the inferior smartphone.  People will always prefer convenience to performance.  The writing is on the wall.  Actually, it's been on the wall for so long that the paint is peeling.

  • 1 month ago

    Why should they?  

    I wouldn't want them to.

  • garry
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    smart phone is a gimmick you dope , it means it can run android or iphone , nothing else , they cant make you a coffee or a hamburger ..

  • 1 month ago

    Sony already do but they aren't significantly better than the other smartphone cameras. I expect camera manufacturers will develop better connectivity though. Smartphones with their tiny little sensors (and Apple's is the smallest of all) ought to only be able to take rubbish quality photos. The reason why they don't is that backlit sensor technology and brilliant software design has improved them considerably. You'll still notice better potential image quality from APS-C and 35mm sensor DSLRs, but just remember that the 35mm sensor is 50 times physically larger and so can easily accommodate the extra photosites/megapixels.  Another consideration is that the current craze of making smartphones ever slimmer makes it harder to conceptualise the idea of a real optical zoom lens with moving parts. What they do now is use an extra camera module and 5x lens (which is lossless) and then digitally zoom down from that.

  • P
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Definitely not.  The legacy camera companies are already playing catchup with the smart phone makers.   Camera companies mostly base their cameras on older lens technology, while the smartphone industry leverage better quality pictures by using the massive processing power contained in flagship smartphones.  Legacy camera makers don't put powerful processors in their cameras and don't have the in house expertise to properly leverage these newer processors.  Legacy camera makers always assumed they would maintain an advantage with the comparatively larger lens' cameras have, but advances in smart phones have made the size of the lens less relevant.   It's very sad when the flagship iphone\Samsung smart phones are taking better pictures and videos than $1000 Nikons and Canons. 

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