Periferalist asked in SportsBaseball · 1 month ago

Now that Hank Aaron is dead (rest in well deserved peace, sir), who's Baseball's greatest living player?

Personally, I'll go with Willie Mays.

71 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    I would say Reggie Jackson 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Yeah Willie mays

  • KTJoe
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Bo Jackson, best baseball player ever almost made hall a fame.

  • 1 month ago

    Ken Griffey Jr.

    From 2000 to 2010 Griffey missed 392 games because of injury. A cracked wrist, torn labrum, disengaged patella, pulled muscles and torn hamstrings probably kept Griffey from setting records the baseball world would probably never see broken. In a time when baseball was encircled by execution improving embarrassments to their most marquee players, Griffey was never genuinely associated with utilizing PEDs. He didn't require them.

    His vocation numbers represent themselves. A vocation .287 hitter with 617 grand slams, 1,787 runs driven in, 2,710 hits, and 1,628 runs scored. Consider he missed what could be compared to three seasons because of injury and it is not difficult to see Griffey hitting more than 700 grand slams, conceivably being the unequaled homer ruler. Jayson Stark of ESPN set aside the effort to assess Griffey's grand slam all out had he remained sound. His figurings, in light of recorded execution, Griffey would have gotten done with 777 grand slams or more critically fifteen more than Barry Bonds. A more unassuming assessment of Griffey's conceivable homer all out by Cliff Corcoran of Sports Illustrated has the slugger getting done with 722 grand slams, in front of Babe Ruth.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Derek Jeter and I'm not even a Spankees fan. 

  • 1 month ago

    Say Hey, Willie might be regarded as the best player ever! His impact was greater than his numbers. Also, nobody has ever said a bad thing about Mays as a person or player. I recently read the Mays biography "24", published last year, and it should be required reading for rapid baseball fans.

  • 1 month ago

    I’d say Willie Mays

  • hamel5
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Mays - he was one of those guys where the stats didn't tell the whole story.  He changed a game, just by being on the  bases or in the outfield - sort of like Mookie Betts.   

    Statistically,  Barry Bonds was the best, but you've got to consider the steroid use. 

    An argument could also be made for Mike Trout. 

  • 1 month ago

    Willie Mays - he will be 90 on May 6th. 

    RIP Hammerin' Hank.

  • 1 month ago

    Oh no.... this is like the fourth or fifth time that I've learned of a famous person's death that I admired on Yahoo! Answers...

    I would agree with Mays. I got my love of Baseball from my grandfather who lived in NYC between the late 1920s and early 1960s....so you can imagine all the great players he witnessed in person.

    He was a die-hard Dodger fan and certified hater of all things related to the Giants even when he moved to the West Coast.  One of my earliest Dodger Stadium memories was a game against the Giants where the teams were honoring several "Old Timers."  Every one of the Giants was heartily booed by the crowd....being a little kid, I joined in on the fun.

    When a guy named "Willie Mays" was introduced, I booed and booed.  But then I felt a firm hand on the top of my head.

    "No," my grandfather said.  "Not him.  We don't boo him."

    "Why not?" I asked, confused.

    "That's Willie Mays," he said.  "The greatest player to have ever played the Game."

    Tha's all the scouting and expert analysis I'll ever need.

    Source(s): RIP Hammerin' Hank
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