Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 1 month ago

If a girl in the early 20th century kissed a guy, would she have been considered a bad girl?

Let's suppose a girl wakes up after a night that she took care of the guy she has a crush on, a young man in his early 20s. He risked dying but thanks to her taking care of him he's still alive. When she wakes up and sees he is alive and feels better she kisses him after a long time where the two had only been arguing. For the moral of that century would that have been considered bad?

Update:

What if she only kissed him because she thought he would have died? 

15 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Ask your shrink. Make sure he knows that you keep doing this.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Here we go again.  What happened to the prisoner?  Enough of this nonsense.  

  • garry
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    put it this way was your grandmother still unkissed or untouched when she married , answer is no , trying to set the standards for there daughter , yes all women had a man before they where married , no different if you are male or female , they had urges that where taken care of while was single .

  • 1 month ago

    Honestly: nobody cares.And who would even know they had kissed?

    Please take your silly pathetic emo couple away and drown them.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Maybe you should try to focus on the 21st century instead. I am not quite sure whether you’re going to survive or not, LOL 😂 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Why don't you go down to the highway and kiss a speeding 18 wheeler?

  • 1 month ago

    People DID kiss in the early 20th century. In fact, there was a custom called "bundling" that the settlers of the West practiced that involved a lot of kissing and "necking". So the kissing would not resulted in her being consided a  bad girl-- but sharing a bed with him definitely would. 

  • Marli
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Are we still on the same story of the weeping girl and the fugitive prisoner? The last episode you sent here had them aboard a ship, posing as a married couple.

    She ran off with him and they were sharing a bed, so yes. She had discarded decent behavior long ago. You know that and she knew that.

    Even if they have not had sex, the act of running away with him has made her a "bad girl" to anyone who knew her. She knew that too.

    A "good girl" in the Victorian and Edwardian era was told not to kiss a man she was not engaged to marry. She was not to permit him to kiss her and she certainly was not to invite or initiate the kiss. If she did, she was labeled "fast" and ostracized by other girls. Boys who kissed her would tell other boys, who would then dare to kiss her. If she kept kissing, she would lose her good reputation.

    Now not every girl in those days was so "don't touch me" about a kiss. Probably many girls hoped that the boy they liked would steal a kiss when and where they were alone. But I will repeat, she was not supposed to kiss him and she was not supposed to encourage him - at least, not act as though she expected to be kissed or say, "Kiss me, you fool." Elinor Glyn's foreign princess in "Three Weeks" was not a "good girl", and the novel was considered very risqué.

    Of course a good looking boy with a seductive line of chat could turn a good girl's heart, especially if the girl was lonely. I mentioned Doctor Crippen a few answers ago. Ethel LeNeve was his typist. He was plagued by a wife who belittled him. She was sympathetic. Who knows if their affair began with a kiss? They made love. She became pregnant and miscarried the child. There was no doubt that they loved each other; but she could have been kicked out of her lodgings when she had the miscarriage.  Her landlady was sympathetic. The landlady's husband was not. Keeping her would give their house a bad reputation if anyone found out. It may have been the reason Dr. Crippen killed his wife - to give Ethel the protection of his name. If not actually marrying her,  they could pretend to be married. Ethel said that Crippen had told her first that his wife had died in California and then that his wife had left him and was living with an old lover in America.  Her family thought the doctor had married her, or at they were least engaged and he would marry her after a "decent interval" after his wife's death. So Crippen, or Crippen and Ethel, found ways to hide or lessen the stigma of "living in sin". They considered themselves married, although not by a clergyman or a justice of the peace, because they had exchanged vows to each other. Ethel was not a flirt or a floosy. She did not go after men, but had went into bed with the one man she loved. A "bad girl" according to society because she broke the rules by having sex, and with a married man too; but in her heart she had "married her soulmate" and so she had done nothing shameful.

  • Cogito
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Please - give it a rest!  This daft story of yours is just awful, so there's absolutely NO point trying to write it.

  • 1 month ago

    Depends.  Certainly NOT after WW2.  Attitudes started to change in the early to mid 1920s.  Pre WW1 attitudes tended to be a lot more restrictive.

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