Is this sentence correct ? I am not going there , Are you ?

16 Answers

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  • Vy
    Lv 5
    4 weeks ago

    "I am not going there , Are you ?" should be correct as: "That is not where I am going, are you?".

  • 1 month ago

    They probably won't have been buckling down. ... For all action words aside from be and have, we use do/does or did to make Yes/No ... about the object of the action word, we put the inquiry word before a Yes/No inquiry: ... Just sentences 1 and 3 are right.

  • 1 month ago

    I am not going there! Are you? Or, I am not going there. Are you?

    The first sentence is about yourself and the second is a sentence about questioning someone else. So, they should be separated by a period.

  • 1 month ago

    I would separate the two sentences with a full-stop (period).  If it were spoken, it would differ according to intonation and spacing between the two.

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  • geezer
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Not quite.

    The commar needs to be a semi-colon

    and the A doesn't need to be a capital.

    I am not going there; are you ?

  • 1 month ago

    This needs a little bit of a touch up.

    I am not going there, are you?

    *No space between the 'e' in 'there' and the comma

    * are does not need a capital 'a'.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I am not going there ; are you ?

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    No.  That's a run-on sentence.

    Correct:  I am not going there.   Are you?

           Or:   I am not going there; are you?

  • 1 month ago

    As these are two independent sentences, you can't join them with just a comma.

    You have several choices:

    I am not going there. Are you?

    I am not going there; are you?

    I am not going there  -  are you? [this should be an 'm' dash but my keyboard won't do one]

  • 1 month ago

    Yes.

    The grammar is right.  Ut it should be two sentences. Any way you have it as one sentence. Which can be done, but then don't capitslize the 'A' in "are you".

    Source(s): Native American English speaker, for 68 years.
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