Do the following sentences have the same meaning?

My father did not have a lot of friends, I followed his lead.

My father did not have a lot of friends, I followed his example.

14 Answers

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  • Vy
    Lv 5
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    The phrase "followed his lead" means "followed his direction", while "followed his example" means "behaved in a similar way".

  • 1 month ago

    Yeah. They mean the same thing. I think the second one works better. 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Neither is a proper sentence.  You can make either sentence proper by replacing the comma with the word "and".  Once you have done that, then either sentence is just fine.

  • garry
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    i am the same as my father who never had a lot of friends , not the other examples .you americans have no idea , do you .

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  • denise
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Yes, they both mean the same,  but I would end the sentence with , I am like him.

  • 1 month ago

    You cannot connect two clauses with just a comma. Use a semi-colon or a period. I would use "lead" more to indicate some activity or path- like a career path, for example. But both sentences would be understood. 

  • OTTO
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Same general meaning. But sentence needs a semicolon instead of a comma.

  • 1 month ago

    Yes......The same meaning, I have heard them used interchangably, in movies and literature.

    The first sentence is more informal. And said  by speakers of American English

    Source(s): Native American English speaker for many years.
  • 1 month ago

    The second one is better.  The first one would work, if your dad was doing something active.  But  in this sentence your dad is not doing anything active.  He is inactive, just existing ....with no friends.  The people who are actively not being friends are doing something.

  • 1 month ago

    Yes, they have the same meaning.  They would both be normal for a native speaker to use.  Sentence #2; however, would be my personal choice if I were writing formally.

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