Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Entertainment & MusicMusicRock and Pop · 1 month ago

Did you like Metallica's Black Album?

12 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes                                         

  • 1 month ago

    It's the album that got me started listening to them. But, its popularity is also its negative. When you mention you listen to Metallica to someone, they think of Enter Sandman and Memory Remains because they're constantly covered. 

    I had what I mentioned above happen to me a couple nights ago when I was telling someone the 80's bands I listen to. I mentioned Metallica and the next thing I see is them pulling out their phone looking up a band they like on Youtube which did a cover of Enter Sandman and showing it to me.

    I don't touch the Black album anymore. I listen to their 80's music.

  • 1 month ago

    Yeah it's quite good

  • 1 month ago

    It's a classic. But it ain't better than the first four. 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Its not bad, but its not great either..

  • 1 month ago

    Can these M-POP ******* get OFF of Metallica's dick?  Metallica is NOT a metal band!  They have been crap since day one.  VOLBEAT is doing what Metallica SHOULD have been doing!  

  • blank
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Yeah it is a good album.My Dad has it.He plays it in the car sometimes.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It's not my favourite Metallica record by any means, but it's certainly nowhere near as bad as the albums they released after it. I think the album gets a lot of hate because of the drastic changes it brought about. Megadeth released "Rust in Peace" roughly one year before Metallica's eponymous 'Black Album', and the follow up, "Countdown to Extinction", released roughly one year after Metallica's 'Black Album' hit shelves, was drastically different. Megadeth continued to water down their signature sound on subsequent releases like "Youthanasia." The same is true for Anthrax. "Sound of White Noise" was a departure from "Persistence of Time." Exodus switched up their sound with "Force of Habit." Testament went for a more easily approachable sound with their early nineties releases, "Souls of Black" and "The Ritual." Metallica had opened a door and contemporary bands didn't waste any time walking through it.  

    I'm not sure that it's fair to lump all of the blame onto Metallica for the dramatic shift in direction that well established thrash bands began to take in the nineties, but they were definitely the first band to embrace the softer, slower, more commercial and over produced sound. The thing is that people liked it. 'The Black Album' is Metallica's best-selling record. "Countdown to Extinction" is Megadeth's best-selling record. "Sound of White Noise" was the best-selling Anthrax album. You get the point. 

    But while Megadeth and Anthrax and Exodus and Testament experimented with a more commercial sound, they never fully came to embrace it. Each of those bands has released a solid record since the nineties that recaptures elements of what put them on the map to begin with back in the eighties. Metallica stands alone as the one band that was really and truly great that made a conscious decision to morph into a band their longtime fans no longer recognised or identified with. For that reason alone, 'The Black Album' does deserve at least some - if not most, of the hate that is often directed at it. 

    Metal bands were struggling to find a new audience in the nineties as the grunge rock scene was exploding. In an effort to attract new listeners and draw in a wider fanbase, bands had to change or risk disappearing altogether. Some did it better than others. Some only did it as long as they had to. But for Metallica, it became a mantra to be liked by a demographic that hadn't grown up listening to the material that laid the foundation for their fame. And the disdain and disrespect that they have shown for their longtime fans has drawn a lot of flak, and rightly so. Essentially, Metallica made the conscious decision to turn their backs on the legions of fans who had been loyal to them since the early days in favour of embracing new ones who much preferred their new sound. 

    They might have become more popular overall, but the legacy they've built for themselves now is strikingly different from the one they would have had if they'd remained true to the people who loved them before they were one of the biggest heavy metal bands of all time. They've lost their charm, their sense of grittiness, and their heart and soul, and they traded all of that in for more money. Obviously making music is about making money, but for Metallica, that's ALL it is. So I, like many former fans, see 'The Black Album' not only as the beginning of a new era, but as the death knell for something that was beautiful and extraordinary. And it's sad because Metallica were instrumental in the formation of thrash as we have come to know it and in all probability would have been remembered as the single greatest thrash band if they hadn't flushed everything down the toilet to become just another generic rock band. 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I agree with the Texas answerer.  Their earlier stuff was better.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Nope..................

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