Yahoo Answers is shutting down on May 4th, 2021 (Eastern Time) and beginning April 20th, 2021 (Eastern Time) the Yahoo Answers website will be in read-only mode. There will be no changes to other Yahoo properties or services, or your Yahoo account. You can find more information about the Yahoo Answers shutdown and how to download your data on this help page.

aria asked in PetsDogs · 1 month ago

Veterinarian wants to do many tests on my senior dog??? Is it REALLY necessary???? offered a health plan?!?

Hello, I have a 10 year old poodle and he is my only dog I've had for this long! I took my dog in today for a skin/coat check because he has warts. The vet also said he wants to do a URINE, blood test, heart worm test, and a DDAP vaccine AS WELL AS a DENTAL EXAM... The dental exam requires blood and urine beforehand.. he said if i sign up for a wellness plan it is all covered... the wellness plan is 540 a year... is it really necessary to have all these things done??? I did have my dog do a dental exam 3 years ago, and hasnt had one since. My dog has never had a heart worm test/treatment before, so is that necessary?? We've kept him up to date with vaccines but IDK do people usually get these tests/exams for their dogs??? I also have a cat and she was recommended for a dental exam too but like i thought having pets was low maintenance and only required shots for the most part... i didnt have pets growing up

Update:

My dog has been going to the vet since he was. Puppy but I don’t remember ever doing any heart worm prevention or treatment s and well I was a teen when we got him but my mom was his owner and she was Poor and we didn’t learn anything about pet care ... I think we did a urine test when he was showing signs of a uti and a blood test to see what was wrong with the uti but that was 4 years ago Ill do dental but 542 is too expensive for a yearly plan ... what do Poor people do???

Update 2:

After considering everything, I decided Im going to work on brushing my dogs teeth and having the groomer brush his teeth. He had a dental cleaning 3 years ago. Im going to see if i can get his teeth super clean and if not i will take him to get the dental cleaning. My dog doesnt go out much I live in a cold state so no we dont have mosquitoes! The vet said warts are normal and they can laser them off but he will just keep getting more so he said there's no point in lasering them off. 

10 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    To me this is just a way for the new age Vets get you to do far more than necessary so they can make more money.  If your dogs mouth doesn't stink & have rotten teeth, the dental is not necessary.  The booster shots are not necessary.  A test for heartworms wouldn't hurt but if you live where there aren't very many mosquitoes, then the dog probably won't have heartworm but the test to see wouldn't be a bad idea.

    I don't have all this done on any of my dogs.  Dogs have all kinds of skin problems & it is normal for them to get warts, skin tags, lumps & bumps.  They seem to want to ignore the reason you took the dog in, you didn't mention a treatment for that.  Just use your common sense & don't let them force you to do something you think is unnecessary.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    • "Veterinarian wants to do many tests on my senior dog??? Is it REALLY necessary???? offered a health plan?!?"

    SHOULD be:

    • "My veterinarian wants to do many tests on my senior dog● Is it REALLY necessary? He offered me a health plan●"

    You should also know that Y!A requires that the first field ENDS with your MAIN question, so actually, that line SHOULD be:

    • "My veterinarian wants to do many tests on my senior dog, and offered me a health plan● Is it REALLY necessary?"

    And your username should be Arial with a capital letter, not arial in all lower-case.

    You NEED to realise that for many people in Y!A, English is only their 2nd or 3rd language, and so YOU must always CHECK and CORRECT your typing before posting it. Actually, I doubt that English is your natural language.

    For the rest of your question I will place ❌ where-ever you started a NAME (such as Poodle, or I) or a sentence with a lower-case letter, or you neglected to use an apostrophe, or you left a word out - thus making it harder for us to understand what you MEANT. Sadly, Emoji is not yet sophisticated enough to supply apostrophes, commas, fullstops, quote-marks in red.

    • "Hello, I have a 10 year old ❌poodle and he is my only dog I've had for this long! I took my dog in today for a skin/coat check because he has warts. The vet also said he wants to do a URINE, blood test, heart worm test, and a DDAP vaccine AS WELL AS a DENTAL EXAM... The dental exam requires blood and urine beforehand.. ❌he said if ❌i sign up for a wellness plan it is all covered... ❌the wellness plan is ❌540 a year... ❌is it really necessary to have all these things done???"

    We have to ASSume that you meant au$540 or nz$540 or us$540 (each of which has a DIFFERENT value!) - but it COULD have been £540 or €540 or ƒ540 or R540 or ₹540 or ¥540 or kr540 or ₽540 - or some other currency. Please develop the habit of being AWARE that this is a BIG world with MANY currencies, and so you need to be SPECIFIC.

    How do you expect US to know whether they are necessary? You haven't TOLD US your pet's BREED (there are FOUR "breeds" of Poodle, varying from 27cm/10½" to 62cm/24½"), and whether he is fertile or a neuter. You haven't even created an "About me" on your Home Page to tell us the YEAR you were born, your nearest CITY or TOWN (add the nation or state if other places use the same name), the things you reckon are interesting ABOUT you, and the topics that interest you most.

    So WE cannot yet tell whether:

    👸🏽1: a "urine test" is necessary at 10 years for a dog of whatever specific BREED you have;

    👸🏽2: a "blood test" (WHICH test?) is necessary at 10 years old for a dog of whatever BREED you have;

    👸🏽3: you live in "heartworm territory" (if so, it IS neccesary unless you have been supplying the protectant at the specified intervals);

    👸🏽4: your "DDAP" means "Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs". If it does, their page is about CoViD-19:   https://www.paproviders.org/secretary-letter-covid...   - and so far CoronaVirus of ANY kind is so rare in dogs that I doubt that a CoViD vaccine has been developed for dogs. You MIGHT have noticed that the 14 or 15 months it took to produce the first CoViD vaccines for humans is amazing - vaccines USUALLY take 3 or more years to be developed and licenced as "SAFE TO USE". Mind you, the CoViD vaccine is VERY different to the killed or attenuated virus vaccines developed for other diseases.

    👸🏽5: a "dental exam"(ination) is necessary. For very small breeds and giant breeds it probably is - but it is quick, the vet needing only to look at enamel & gum of each of the teeth (SHOULD be 42!) your dog has. But x-rays MIGHT be necessary.

    • "I did have my dog do a dental exam 3 years ago, and hasn❌t had one since. My dog has never had a heart worm test/treatment before, so is that necessary??

    [Amos] should NEVER have written:☠ "So if you have no concern over heartworms = THEN SKIP IT."She should KNOW that IGNORANT owners don't KNOW whether their pet has been bitten by a mosquito that is incubating the (Stage2? Stage 3?) larvae (there are NO heartworm carriers in my nation and I've forgotten which stage the larva is at when squirted intothe pooch that the mosquito is sucking blood from) - not until the adult worms are big enough to block the heart, and the dog passes out and dies.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XP1JEpIwWZY

    shows too much talk, and only brief parts of the surgery - but I got sick of sites that DEMANDED my password.I cannot predict what YOUR vet would charge for removing those young ADULT heartworms. But if your pet has ADULT heartworms it is NOT safe to use the "preventative". Nor is it safe to leave them alive, to soon be added to by juvenile heartworms becoming adult heartworms.I don't have to worry about heartworms, because the area of ocean between my nation and anywhere where heartworms exist is too long for a mosquito to fly across - and no dogs are allowed onto "my" country unless they have been dosed before leaving their country, so "my" mosqitoes can't swallow any Stage 1 larvae inthe blood of whatever it is biting, to soon pass on to different dogs.👸🏽 But unless you live in one of the few places where a vet can honestly say, "No heartworms in THIS district!", you DO need to know whether your 10-year old is safe to use a protectant on, OR is infested with adult heartworms that MUST be removed before you start using a protectant.

    • "We've kept him up to date with vaccines"

    WHICH vaccines? The CORE vaccine used at 8, 12, and 16 weeks old should last for life - and are the ONLY vaccinations my GSDs have needed unless they are to be flown to places such as the Americas, Asia, Australia, or Europe. If you are in "rabies territory" most of the world currently requires that the vet vaccinates and CERTIFICATES each pooch at 18 weeks old, 1 year later, and every 3 years after that - and YOU have to keep that certificate. But there are many other diseases for which vaccinations might be needed, depending on WHERE you chose to live.

    • "but IDK do people usually get these tests/exams for their dogs???"

    IMPOSSIBLE for us to tell - you haven't supplied the PRECISE INFORMATION we would need.

    If you contact any of the licensed dog-rescue organisations (such as an SPCA) you will find that THEY almost ALWAYS have to vaccinate & neuter every pooch they accept or collect. Sadly, as there are no LAWS defining whether a person is able to AFFORD the feeding and fencing and kenneling and training and veterinary checks dogs need, and to BAN those persons neither COMPETENT nor WILLING to do those things, FAR too many pooches end up in highly unsatisfactory ownership & accommodation.

    • "I also have a cat and she was recommended for a dental exam too but like ❌i thought having pets was low maintenance and only required shots for the most part... ❌i didn❌t have pets growing up"

    Which COULD be why you have such unrealistic ideas about what is involved, and the INFORMATION you must supply when asking a question about any Canis lupus familiaris.

    A pet costs about the same during its lifetime, regardless of where/who it came from and how long it lives for.

    But...

    ✔️ The ones for which maintenance is low come from EXPERIENCED BREEDERS who CHARGE you part of what it cost them for: (1) the genetic testing to PROVE that their bìtch is very low risk for the hereditary disorders found in THAT breed; plus (2) the competitive showing to PROVE that their bìtch is typical of the correct members of their breed; plus (3) the training & competition to earn the qualifications that PROVE their bìtch has the agility + character + determination + instincts needed for that breed's tasks; and (4) paid the stud fee of a suitable male who also has those PROOFS - and preferably already has young adult offspring to PROVE that he produces offspring with his qualities and is very low risk for producing the genetic problems found in that breed. They usually have a printed & signed Guarantee stating what financial compensation you will receive if YOUR pet develops genetic problems within a specified time-frame.

    😡 The ones whose PURCHASE price is low usually cost you HEAPS for medical attention at frequent intervals, and often have a sadly short lifespan.

    • "Update: My dog has been going to the vet since he was ❌. ❌Puppy but I don’t remember ever doing any heart worm prevention or treatment s and well I was a teen when we got him but my mom was his owner and she was ❌Poor and we didn’t learn anything about pet care ... I think we did a urine test when he was showing signs of a uti and a blood test to see what was wrong with the uti but that was 4 years ago❌ I❌ll do dental but ❌542 is too expensive for a yearly plan ...❌what do ❌Poor people do???"

    Suffer and die, of course, unless they - like me - have a free public health system paid for by past & current taxpayers. But demand is high, and so some people die before they can get an appointment in the hospital. I guess I should have made sure that I was born to RICH parents!

    And POOR people's neglected untreated dogs suffer and die miserably.

    King Les The Lofty - first pup in 1950, GSD trainer & breeder as of Easter 1968

    Attachment image
  • TK
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You have a ten year old poodle and you are calling it a senior dog.  Does it look old?  Because poodles live well into their teens, so your dog should be middle-aged.  

    If heartworm is in your area, then your dog should have an annual test and should be on preventative.

    Did the vet see bad teeth?  If yes, then the teeth need to be cleaned and pre-sedation blood tests should be done to check organ function.  I'm not sure what a urine check has to do with sedation and I would question that.

    "Keeping up on vaccinations" has changed in the past 20 years.  No longer should we be giving annual vaccinations.  The core vaccines (canine distemper and parvovirus, adenovirus type 2, parainfluenza) last three to seven years.  Vaccinating more often can cause problems, such as autoimmune disorders. 

  • 1 month ago

     then i suggest visiting another vet

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Nope. They just want your money. Dogs help make vets bank.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Yes of course and $540 is a bargain for all of that.

    The dental exam doesn't require blood and urine.  The actual dentistry does because it requires general anesthesia.

    All of this is standard medical care especially for a senior pet.  

    Now that your dog is ten, plan on at least a couple grand a year in medical costs.   I'm seriously not kidding.  

    Very few dogs (or people) go from cradle to grave without acute or chronic medical issues.     It would be very nice if we all just went to sleep one night perfectly healthy and then died, but it usually doesn't work that way.   

  • 1 month ago

    Most of these are done YEARLY.    If your dog is in good health, he can easily live another 7+ years.   10 yrs old is not exactly on his death bed.

    $540 is a good deal if it really does cover all those tests, exams and dental

  • 1 month ago

    The "senior panel" (as it is called at many vets) can be cheaper than only doing only some of these tests, separately or also doing them in a younger dog.  My vet actually offered me the option to SAVE money on a 5 yr old, and we took it.  My blood work also included a thyroid panel - and that can run low in dogs (as they age) causing many difficulties besides weight gain.  I choose to have a senior panel run on my senior, yearly.  Too much can go wrong (as dogs age) not to have a thorough EXAMINATION (inside & out).  I do the same for MYSELF (yearly).

    Doing blood and urine tells you a LOT about the full health of your dog.  Example: higher than normal calcium values - can signal cancer.  If your breed is prone to Diabetes, Cushing's, Addisons disease, all will show up in the urine or lab results.  Poor liver values or kidney disease (or potential infection from say a bad tooth) can also be detected, as can the above mentioned hypothyroidism.  

    If your dog has never had a heartworm test - that means you have not EVER given your dog heartworm prevention - and  that is not SAFE to do, in many countries (world wide).  You cannot get heartworm prevention WITHOUT the dog being screened.  Sure, you can choose not to test for it - but you also can't buy the preventative medication (w/o YEARLY testing) as it would be unsafe to give the prevention to a heartworm POSITIVE dog.  So if you have no concern over heartworms = THEN SKIP IT.   But the vet will probably NOT put the dog under without it (can't if the dog HAD heartworms; as it would have a BAD HEART).  

    You can also choose to skip the vaccinations, if you want.  Most dog are not covered (for life) with just the puppy boosters - but over-vaccination (yearly) can bring on, its own issues.  I TITRE TEST my dogs to determine if they NEED protection from Parvo or Distemper virus. (Mine need shots about ever 3 years.)

    The dental exam and (I assume CLEANING) is pretty important in senior dogs.  The vet will have to put your dog UNDER, so yes, for their own protection => they need to KNOW your dog is healthy enough to undergo anesthesia before doing so.  Tooth infections can lead to infections that go systemic, and can even damage the heart. 

    Like cars, dogs need MAINTENANCE.  Only a few people are smart enough to be able to do more than..... check the oil, antifreeze levels & tire pressure - on cars.  Unless you have a medical degree, your dog needs to be checked for a myriad of things that can signal illness, disease or conditions that due to AGING.  You can choose to have your dog LONGER, by insuring it REMAINS healthy, or play Russian roulette with its health.  It is ENTIRELY - YOUR choice.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Best I can say about all of that is if you don't/can't trust the vet you use, move on.

    I think of all of what's suggested, getting a dental done is probably the most important.  And of course, the heart worm test.    I don't booster mine after around 7 years unless there's a local flare-up of one of the sometimes fatal dog diseases.  

    If mine have to have a g/a, I have all the pre-anaesthetic tests done.   Yes, it's extra, but I always think that if I don't, Sods Law I'll lose the dog when under.  That test shouldn't involve urine. 

    I'd suggest your vet (apart from kerching) is covering all bases if he's not seen your dog before.   It might be a comfort to know he can go into his twilight years, pain-free.

    Some here might say it's all necessary when a dog goes in for a health check, others disagree!!

  • 1 month ago

    Dental exams should be every 12 months.

    All the others are reasonable for a dog this age.

    Your dog could reasonably live another 5 years.

    Pets require nearly as much care as children. I would never consider a dog or cat 'low maintenance'.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.