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Why do electricians touch live wires but don’t get electrocuted?

23 Answers

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  • zgraf
    Lv 4
    3 weeks ago

    I think electricians do get shocked every now-and-then.  No doubt about it.    If you have to work around anything dangerous day-in-and-day-out, you gradually get a bit lackadaisical -- maybe even lazy -- and you don't take all the precautions you should.   It's like asking a pro race-car driver why he/she doesn't worry about crashing when driving around a track at c. 200 mph.  You kind of get desensitized to all the dangers after a while...

  • 1 month ago

    I was surprised to see that professional electricians didn't seem to turn off the power when working on low voltage (house wiring, 100 - 250 VAC) circuits. They know not to touch bare hot wires if possible, and if so, then not while grounded. But if they do get shocked, it's generally only a surprise, and not fatal. With high voltage circuits, they absolutely can die from touching one wire, even if somewhat insulated, and turn the power off.

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  • garry
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    they handle the the wire by the insulation not the bare wire ..havent you seen an electrician not wear rubber gloves before ..

  • 1 month ago

    I was surprised to see that professional electricians didn't seem to turn off the power when working on a low voltage (house wiring, 100 - 250 VAC) circuits.  They know not to touch bare hot wires if possible, and if so, then not while grounded.  But if they do get shocked, it's generally only a surprise, and not fatal.  With high voltage circuits, they absolutely can die from touching one wire, even if somewhat insulated, and turn the power off.

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  • 1 month ago

    For safety reasons, they have to shut off power to work on the wires.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Because they are not grounded so there is no path for the electricity to flow through them. Christin K is wrong, watched my Uncle touch live wires as a kid when he replaced a light switch in my room. 

  • 1 month ago

    They don't touch live wires. they turn off the power before touching any wires--it's just common sense. 

  • 1 month ago

    small jobs will as a rule, turn off the live power.You do the work, and then turn it on again.I'm not a large power guy

    Source(s): burnt tools
  • 1 month ago

    Because they weared a special type of gloves.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    They have rubber gloves, they can still get a slight burn but they don't get sent flying.

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